The Book of the War (novel)

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The Book of the War was the first novel in the Faction Paradox series.

Edited by Lawrence Miles and written collaboratively by more than ten authors, The Book of the War was formatted like an encyclopedia, with a number of stories spread across multiple alphabetically-sorted entries. In each entry, some words were emphasised in bold to point to other entries with that name, enabling the reader to jump around the book and read related entries.

The summary on this page follows the "intended" reading order specified in the Design Specs for Advanced Users, which were published on a hidden page of the Faction Paradox website,[2] rather than alphabetically as they appear in the book. Two errors were deliberately included in the "Design Specs": the nonexistent entry "Scarratt's Group" in "The A-Z of the War"; and the exclusion of an "easter egg" entry which was not linked to in other entries and therefore unfindable except by reading in alphabetical order, which we have elected to place at the extreme end of the summary.

Publisher's summary[[edit]]

The Great Houses: Immovable. Implacable. Unchanging. Old enough to pass themselves off as immortal, arrogant enough to claim ultimate authority over the Spiral Politic.

The Enemy: Not so much an army as a hostile new kind of history. So ambitious it can re-write worlds, so complex that even calling it by its name seems to underestimate it.

Faction Paradox: Renegades, ritualists, saboteurs and subterfugers, the criminal-cult to end all criminal-cults, happy to be caught in the crossfire and ready to take whatever's needed from the wreckage… assuming the other powers leave behind a universe that's habitable.

The War: A fifty-year-old dispute over the two most valuable territories in existence: "cause" and "effect."

Marking the first five decades of the conflict, THE BOOK OF THE WAR is an A to Z of a self-contained continuum and a complete guide to the Spiral Politic, from the beginning of recordable time to the fall of humanity. Part story, part history and part puzzle-box, this is a chronicle of protocol and paranoia in a War where the historians win as many battles as the soldiers and the greatest victory of all is to hold on to your own past…

Alt text[[edit]]

The War so far (in highlights); the location of the exact centre of history; the lo-tech way to break into the Eleven-Day Empire; the truth about gravity spiders; the dangers of investigating Violent Unknown Events; the art of breeding your own timeship; a short history of the various ends of humanity; the fate of the Grandfather's Arm; the secrets of removing yourself from history while still leaving yourself free to interfere; a brief interruption from the future; where to meet every human being who ever lived; how to bring your world to the attention of the Spiral Politic using 23,000 corpses; why the War-time powers never recruit celebrities; the problems of running a time-active brothel; on telling the difference between the afterlife and the trailer; banality as a weapon of War; the Faction Paradox guide to Hollywood; and how the Sixth Wave revealed the truth about the enemy without even trying.

Plot[[edit]]

The Core Entries[[edit]]

Causalities of War[[edit]]

A War which "at this stage (…) remains the War, not yet having enough of its mass in a single region or era to be given a more specific title" has been raging across space and time for 50 subjective years. A book is published to serve as a guide to this War, and opens with a list of the main participants.

The Great Houses, an ancient, voyeuristic civilisation of demigods who remain the "central power" of this "War Era universe", think themselves to be "parts of the historical process much more than a people". Though they fought another war at the very beginning of history, they still consider the idea of having a military ridiculous when the enemy revealed themselves "mere decades" before the start of the new War, they had become complacent. One of the Houses' errors is failing to truly understand the enemy, viewing them as a species or faction when they are really "a kind of all-consuming process", so the book elects to not mention the enemy's name, even if it does have one, because its anonymous authors believes the name would be a distraction from the essence of the enemy.

Despite their misapprehension, the Houses do adapt, and establish a House Military whose cohorts are bred for war. The House Military has begun to operate at "a safe distance" from the "old academicians". Also responding to the changes is Faction Paradox, a rogue House leaves the Homeworld in the years leading up to the War because they foresee the "vulgarity" to which their kind will soon descend and decide to get a head start. They start recruiting humans into their ranks and operating underground as a sort of criminal or terrorist organisation, seemingly hoping that the bigger sides of the War will wipe each other out and leave them to pick over the leftovers. To build themselves an army, they pervert a human offshoot into the fetishistic Remote, "the barbarians of the Spiral Politic", but they soon become so unpredictable that they fallen out of the Faction's control.

The Celestis also leave the Homeworld before the War, though they were not so much a House as an "elite cadre" of interventionists. Fearing that the Great Houses' defeat could mean their erasure from history, they preemptively excise themselves from the material world, becoming little more than ghosts. They manifest themselves as gods to "those individuals who've been tricked into worshipping them" but wield little real power and are considered demonic traitors by the rest of the War-mongers.

The Great Houses label all species not connected to themselves or the Enemy's power-bases as "lesser species". This includes humanity, but the volume is also, "for obvious reasons", concerned with them. However, although the War has intersected with Earth's history as early as 1752, they are important to the major powers not in their own right but because of the time-active capabilities of humanity's descendants, the posthuman sects, and of the mysterious City of the Saved, "a region of dubious origin which exists beyond the end of causality, and which seems to act as a "backup file" for the entire human species".

In any case, it is often observed that the War is slowly "turning every culture into a War culture", which the possible implication that "one day every individual in recordable time will become either a child of the Houses or a child of the enemy".

The Spiral Politic[[edit]]

The Spiral Politic is described. The most common way of describing the structure of the War Era universe, it is not a physical map of the universe or causality, but a symbolic map of the ways in which different planets' histories do or do not interact with each other. The Spiral Politic as it is known in the current version of reality was created by the Great Houses with them at the centre through the event known as the anchoring of the thread; the more closely related a world's history is to that of the Homeworld, the closer to the centre of a 2D map of the Spiral Politic it appears, and the more stable it normally is, while worlds on the outer fringes, far from the Houses' control, are constantly shifting in their relative positions as their histories are altered by shifting War-time alliances with one side or another.

On the whole, the Houses rather wish everything on the map stayed as still as possible, but this is an increasingly thin hope as the fifty years of War cause the map to shift more and more. Much terminology exists describing the different "types" of worlds on the map, based on the ways in which they do or do not "move", including shooting star worlds, Time-Front Worlds, Scarred Worlds, Remote Worlds, Posthuman Worlds, Frontier Worlds, and the confusingly-named Non-Worlds (which do not physically exist in the universe but are still causally connected to the Spiral). It is also rumoured that certain areas in the Houses' maps of the Spiral Politic describe time-active individuals with an outsized influence on history rather than actual planets.

Other universes exist, in the form of "separate bubbles of matter and energy cut off from the Spiral Politic by immeasurable stretches of un-space". However, it is widely believed that crossing these distances is basically impossible, with only the Yssgaroth having ever managed to intrude on the Spiral Politic from the "outside".

The Great Houses[[edit]]

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The Great Houses' recorded history begins with the anchoring of the thread. This event would later come to be understood as "merely" the point when the Homeworlders built their timeships and sealed their world in a bubble of enclosed time. However, it actually represents the point when they ascended to become "something 'other', something too fundamental to exist merely within the confines of the newly-created Spiral Politic" — gods, in a sense, although the word "suggests something primal, potent and ambitious" while individual members of the Houses became ontologically sterile and shrivelled and static as a result of making themselves anchors of static history. Indeed, they become biologically sterile, "not necessarily by design", around the time of the anchoring, forcing them to develop breeding engines that artificially weave together "base matter and biodata" to create new individuals. They also learn how to make themselves immortal, "at least in theory".

Deprived of organic evolution or the "spur" of mortality, the Houses remain stuck in a form of cultural stasis for the following ten million years during which they wield absolute power. They have little interest in high art (which they find incomprehensible), history (since everything in their being trends towards the status-quo), physical pleasure (their continued organic existence bothers them slightly, though not enough to discard their bodies, as that would be too radical). They occupy themselves with little more than "humanitarian" interventions to prevent lesser time-active parties from damaging causality, which is really born of self-interest too, being that history is an extension of them.

Eventually, the status quo begins to crumble with the Imperator Presidency, the rise of House Paradox, and of course the War itself. Now, fifty years in, life for the Houses on their own world remains as stuffy as ever, but their influence on the wider universe is much more immediate, with the War King and his agents steering the history of many worlds directly; moreover, allegiances are now split, with some Newblood bloodlines allying themselves with the House Military over the traditional Ruling Houses. In short, if the Great Houses are gods, then the War is a new War in Heaven.

The House Military[[edit]]

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For most of its history, the Homeworld had no real army; symbolic constabularies were ordered around by various Houses to "keep the peace" but had little to do, as there was very little crime. When armed intervention was needed in the outside universe, constructs known as casts were employed. However, in the decades before the War, in addition to small flashes of the War to come, the Homeworld becomes more familiar to the outside universe and various doomed armies try to invade the Homeworld physically. Although they are unsuccessful, they make plain the constabularies' near-total uselessness.

This leads some of the more restless Houses, Oldblood and Newblood alike, to band together into a more effective House Military. Although they remain officially part of the same political entity as the other Houses, there is a clear ideological schism between their interpretation of the Protocols and the traditionalist Houses', which everybody in the field recognises. Indeed, many of the "time-front troops" spend their whole lives in the outside universe, which warps their understanding of reality far beyond the minds that a lifetime safe within the Homeworld's bubble of history could ever mould.

The early Waves of House Military soldiers are still humanoid, but even before the War, select field agents had been the subject of experiments with forms of regeneration refined for military purpose so that each new incarnation was "stronger, faster, and better-equipped", drifting gradually from the classic human form. As early as the Third Wave, forced regen missions have become a reality. At first the changes merely create more resistant or telepathic humanoids, but it soon becomes clear to the soldiers themselves that the form of regeneration with which they've been primed is designed to eventually turn them into totally inhuman war machines. House authorities reply to complaints from Second Wave veterans by pointing out that if they really wish to avoid this fate, all they need to do is fight so well that they avoid getting killed.

This development naturally widens the schism between the House Military and the ruling Houses: the force-regenerated soldiers simultaneously resent their fate, and come to view the Oldbloods as puny, weak, different, "and ultimately untrustworthy". It is forecast that if left unchecked for a few more centuries, the schism could result in House Military and regular Great Houses coming to be seen as two different species altogether, with a civil war between the two offshoots becoming inevitable.

The Celestis[[edit]]

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Another group which appears in the centuries leading up to the War are a movement of interventionists who pursue personal ambition and flout the non-interference policy, committing multiple retro-genocides on lesser species without the approval of the Ruling Houses. They manipulate the politics of the other Great Houses and the Presidency, even sometimes going as far as to carry out assassinations, because they believe the Houses should act more like imperious Gods, actively reshaping the universe to their needs at their whim.

When War predictions notify them of the existence of a foe "just as 'divine'", they are thrown into existential despair by the idea of not only being killed, but being erased from history altogether, if the Homeworld were to lose the war. In a move that baffles the rest of the universe, they decide to dodge out of being erased from history by erasing themselves from history. Specifically, they use an engineer forced-paradox state to erase their physical forms from history while living on as disembodied minds and ideas, having banked on the fact that god-like beings like themselves never really needed physical bodies to hold court. They found a new base of operations called Mictlan on the "outer skin" of the universe and begin to call themselves the Celestial House.

However, they are widely reviled by the other Houses and the universe at large as traitors who abandoned their homeworld in its hour of need. Moreso than the bored gods they hoped to become and continue to believe themselves to be, they are viewed as demons, a state of affairs not helped by their habit of manifesting in monstrous physical forms to mortals, or theirconstant need to strike "Faustian bargains" with members of the lesser species to sustain their own existence: as living ideas, the Celestis can only survive as long as they are believed in. Having retained power over life and death, they lure these victims with promises of immortality and make them take their Mark of Indenture, which allows the Celestis to trap their minds in Mictlan forever after the destruction of their original physical bodies.

Insisting that they are above the Spiral Politic rather than parasites dependent on it, the Celestis have a limited impact on the War. However, some of them do get involved, claiming that they view it only as a game. Though they sometimes help their old compatriots of the Homeworld, they also sell conceptual entities to the enemy, for which reason they are not accepted as allies by the House Military, many units of which are ordered to destroy on sight the entities which the "proper" Homeworlders refer to as "the spineless monstrosities". However, they rarely enter the fray themselves in any case, preferring to act through their Investigators.

Faction Paradox[[edit]]

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Headed by an epigraph by Cousin Eliza of the Faction Paradox Military Wing, the entry on Faction Paradox starts with a disclaimer that common encapsulations of the Faction as either a cult or a crime syndicate, while not inaccurate, miss the mark on the true essence of the organisation, which is more of an unending carnival existing in parody of the universe: the Faction does not act to acquire power, nor out of any "inherent sense of sadism", but simply to make a point and out of a sense that "the universe would be lacking if nobody did it".

The history of what would become Faction Paradox starts on the Homeworld, five centuries before the War. The Homeworld is experiencing a sense of unease and more changes than in the million years prior. The Ruling Houses are naturally outraged when a member of an old, eccentric bloodline comes before them to announce he is founding a new Great House, something which had remained enshrined in law but which had not been done in long ages. Compounding the shock is his declaration of the new family's name — "House Paradox", with him becoming "Grandfather Paradox" — is, according to legend, his attire, includes the the first Faction Paradox skull mask. This fashion choice is of particular significance on the Homeworld because the rejection of organics there at this time was so great that many of the witnesses to the declaration had very probably never seen a skull before, and likely did not realise what the Grandfather was even wearing.

As the Grandfather anticipated, the Ruling Houses are too stunned and appalled by what he presents that they "let the matter slip noisily by" rather than thinking to veto his decision while there's still time. However, the nascent House Paradox wastes no time in beginning to experiment with alternative time-dynamics, in obvious breach of the Homeworld's laws on how history should work. This provide grounds for their exile from the Homeworld, adopting the name of Faction Paradox and becoming the first cuckoo-House, recruiting members of the lesser species into its rank instead of relying on breeding engines.

However, on the cusp of the War, the Grandfather deletes himself from existence. Leader-less, the Faction is made more practical by the necessities of War and becomes a political-criminal organisation spanning the entire Spiral Politic, with cabals in hundreds of locations, agents on hundreds of worlds, and a predilection for "stirring up even more trouble" between the other Houses and the enemy. They try to build themselves an army in the form of the Remote so as to boost themselves up to the status of a major power with a chance against the big two, but these crude attempts at power-base-building are decimated by the Second Wave, and they retreat to a more patient, calculating demeanour, waiting to pick over what will be left once the two main sides have annihilated each other.

Now, fifty years into the War, the Faction are beginning to recover from the Second Wave, with links being reestablished between the Eleven-Day Empire and the diaspora of Faction cabals. They hope that the Houses' now-total commitment to fighting the Enemy means that they can live in relative peace from now on and focus on their work — "whatever that work may turn out to be".

The Faction Paradox Family[[edit]]

Inset in the Book's entry on the Faction is an overview of the ranks used by the Faction and their significance, icluding, in order, Little Siblings, Cousins, Parents, and Godparents. The Grandfather himself is also listed, in an entry which reveals that he "never actually existed — and has now never actually existed for over two hundred years", having purposefully erased himself from time. He left behind a few relics, such as the knife purportedly used in the Act of Severance, and his name is rarely invoked in vain by members of the Faction because they believe that too much invocation might summon him back into existence, and that this would only irritate him.

The Remote[[edit]]

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Shortly before the War, while operating as a criminal syndicate and trying to build proper power-bases on various planets, the Faction become fascinated by planets in humanity's expansionist era where the colonists become so completely driven by the "signals" of their media that they become more important in understanding these humans than physical geography or indeed any other factor. The Faction, unfamiliar with the concept of mass media (which don't exist on the Homeworld), are entranced and begin to think of these media signals as a different form of the loa they themselves worship: non-physical cultural constructs regulating their respective societies without being in the power of any individual or group within them.

At first the Faction's experiments take the form of introducing new concepts — new spirits-in-the-making — to the media of preexisting colonies and watching them grow and reshape the society around them. However, after the Great Houses take notice and begin wiping out "infected" societies, the Faction make up for lost time by putting their new knowledge to use creating "true" Remote societies ex nihilo. These absolutist Remote colonies no longer had conventional media, but instead a single mass transmission system at their core, with every inhabitant picking them up directly through ear implants. The Faction hope to use these Remote as an army, although early experiments such as "the entirely ludicrous assault on Simia-KK98" prove less than encouraging.

Before long, the master-plan begins to fall apart due to the Second Wave's coordinated genocide of all groups and colonies connected to the Faction. Desperate, the Faction turn to "evacuating, crypto-forming, and sometimes even hiding" entire planets. Becoming restless due to the saturation of War-related propaganda in their signals, many of the Remote blaze their own trails across the Spiral Politic without any actual orders from the Faction, with only two of the original Remote colonies staying put. As they come into contact with the media of other worlds they invade, their Faction programming becomes ever more garbled, until the Remote become complete anarchists whose only stable directive is to make war on "the ruling powers of the Spiral Politic" — whoever they might happen to be.

Lesser Species[[edit]]

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Before the War, the term of "lesser species" was used by the Great Houses for all species other than themselves. However, in the new state of affairs, Newblood Houses have taken to using it to refer to non-time-active species, granting that other time-travelling races count as higher species. The Book acknowledges that this makes some sense, insofar as there is, per the Protocols of the Great Houses, a deep and important difference between the biodata of time-travellers and non-time-travellers.

In the War era, posthumanity soon becomes one of the so-called "lesser species" with the most insistent claim to being equals of the great War-time powers, because much of their "territory" is inaccessible to the Great Houses' observation, and is therefore of key strategic significance to them as they fear the enemy may hide out there. Indeed, some posthumans, including the posthuman "War Goddess" known as the Immaculata Formosii, form actual alliances with the enemy and come to think of themselves as "full-time War participants".

In contrast, some posthuman castes remain proud of their status as non-time-active being, due to a belief that time-travellers forsake their "true identity" and their destiny as part of altering their biodata to travel in time: whatever the Great Houses say of their "Homeworld", they fundamentally do not belong anywhere, being little more than "friend-of-a-friend stories who happen to be wearing badly-fitting bodies". This logic is not taken very seriously by the authors of the Book, who seem to gently chide humanity's belief that it has a truly special, rather than coincidental, role in the War.

Yssgaroth[[edit]]

When the Great Houses carry out the anchoring of the thread, constructing history as it's now known, they make it in such a way that its meta-structure is held together by various node points spread throughout the Spiral Politic. Due to the tension they are under, these are also "weak points" in the fabric of the universe, where, in a very real sense, the "foam-structures of the continuume" are weakened by the strain.

This proves devastating when something crosses over from outside the universe into the newly-founded Spiral Politic through the Caldera. Although perceived as a specific individual from the alter-dimensional species, later thinkers would go on to speculate that the Yssgaroth may be a huge, gestalt entity capable of splitting itself into smaller drones, or even that the Yssgaroth may be more of a phenomenon than a species, an antibody system of the foreign universe trying to defend itself against contact with the Great Houses' universe, appearing as a haze of ghastly monsters due to the Great Houses projecting their own deepest fears onto the "areas of hostile anti-structure".

Whatever the Yssgaroth's true nature, the crossing over of the "true" Yssgaroth at the Caldera allows weaker creatures of a similar ilk, referred to as "servants of the Yssgaroth" by the Houses, to begins warming all across history, entering via rifts that form at the node points. An unimaginably terrible war ensues, with whole worlds being lost to the cruelty of the Yssgaroth so thoroughly that the Great Houses have no other choice but to put them out of their misery via retro-genocide. The war ultimately ends in a victory for the Great Houses, who successfully seal all the breaches, covering them up with forced-matter shells to disguise them as planets.

However, because it is in Yssgaroth biomass's nature to "hybridise and corrupt", traces of the Yssgaroth corruption remain throughout history. On Earth, Arabic and Middle Eastern traditions term humans turned "malformed and predatory" by the Yssgaroth taint as "the Mal'akh". The Yssgaroth war having occurred in the infancy of the structure of history itself also means that all cultures in the universe create legends about vampires and similar monsters, even if they never had any actual contact with the Yssgaroth.

When the War in Heaven starts, proving wrong the commonly-accepted notion that the Yssgaroth was a "war to end all wars", some of the older Houses suggest that the only way a hostile force might exist within ordered history is if it was placed there by outside influence, meaning the enemy must have been propped up by the Yssgaroth. However, this is considered unlikely by most, as the enemy is at least "civilised, cultured, and intelligent enough to ahve an agenda beyond pure destruction".

The History of Faction Paradox[[edit]]

The Anchoring of the Thread[[edit]]

The early universe is a "structureless" place where time has yet to coalesce into the linear structure of history as it would become known. However, sensing that it will eventually harden into something more solid, the Great Houses come to fear how other intelligences might influence the shape of the future, with "early deep-time explorations" performed by the Houses' pioneers confirming the existence, somewhere in the possible future, of things too powerful for the Houses to destroy. After a few clumsy attempts to avert the individual existence of such creatures, the Houses devise a grander solution: to enact the calcification of history themselves and stitch themselves, "or at least their culture", into that very culture, creating a structure that would allow creatures like them to monitor and manipulate time in the rest of the universe. One of the perks of this "bonding" would be "virtual indestructibility" as a species, at the cost of infertility and cultural stagnancy.

Committing to this plan, the Great Houses begin to embed some of their proto-timeships at various strategic points in the "formative future", while building the machine-heart on the Homeworld itself. Later lore also speaks of a single, enormous device, although the Book's narrative voice is skeptical of those accounts. Eventually, after all is made ready, a ceremony is held in the centre of the machine-heart as the "elite representatives" gather, standing in for their respective Houses, while field agents take their places in their timeships at the other ends of each of the "threads".

This day is also the first day of the first War in Heaven as things "far, far worse" than the possible future species the Houses hoped to erase enter the continuum at the site of the machine-heart, their first, "primal manifestation" destroying the machinery and creating the caldera at the centre of the newborn structure of history. After the end of this war against the Yssgaroth, the caldera became a cornerstone of the Houses' culture, and the only trace of the Yssgaroth's existence the Houses deigned acknowledge, House Paradox's armour notwithstanding. In the era of the second War, it would also become of great strategic importance, being a "prime target" for the enemy.

Faction Paradox Armour[[edit]]

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Their intricate bone armour, "part weapon and part carnival costume" is the most infamous "fetish" of Faction Paradox, raising endless questions about whether it was designed for battle, for ritual, or simply to irritate the Great Houses. However, the origin of the bones of the default armour is poorly understood.

They appear to be the skeletons of two-metre-tall humanoids with bloated, bat-like skulls, and the Faction's claim is that they are the skulls of Homeworlders from an alternate timeline where the Houses lost their war against the Yssgaroth. The Houses vigorously deny this, in line with their denial of there being any such thing as alternate timelines, and even some Faction researchers believe that this simple story is incomplete at best.

Indeed, it is known that all the bones used to create the classic suits of armour were sourced from the same place: an "abomination's graveyard" discovered by the Grandfather's four Godfather-lieutenants, likely by stepping through the caldera. The first set of Faction armour was worn by the Grandfather at the Audience of the Ruling Houses, and later lore depicts it as an extremely stylised example of the form, its huge helmet completely covering the Grandfather's head, with each of the Godfather-lieutenants having a similar but subtly different suit of armour.

At any rate, the modern Faction is no stranger to alterations to the basic design. Many lesser Cousins are never issued a full armour, but simply a ceremonial mask. Less radically, Cousins of the Military Wing stationed in the Eleven-Day Empire typically wear a lighter, more combat-ready variant of the armour, which leaves their face exposed and seems to be made from smaller Mal'akh creatures. Some experiment further, with Belial notoriously using the skull of a mammoth for his mask.

Audience of the Ruling Houses[[edit]]

Of the few Audiences of the Ruling Houses held before the War, two involved the Grandfather.

The first is a formality which sees him formally declaring that he is about to found a new House and that new House-Foundations will accordingly be "rooted into the Homeworld's reproductive matrix". The second, on the other hand, four hundred years before the War, was a disciplinary hearing where the Grandfather was called to accounts to answer allegations that House Paradox was carrying out illegal experiments with alter-time structures. Even though he is wearing full Yssgaroth bone armour, "at best a message of defiance, at worst a thinly-veiled threat", he is allowed to walk free. Despite later mythologised accounts suggesting this was because he made some brilliant, mesmerising speech, the Book speculates that he didn't have to say a word: the sheer fact was that no member of the Houses had ever engaged in something so starkly counter-cultural as death-fetishism, and, bereft of any law or precedent to fall back on, the House representatives flatly did not know how to even begin to react, sitting in appalled silence until the Grandfather walked away. As the Book pithily remarks, "House Paradox wouldn't be brought to 'justice' for many years, and by that time the Homeworld would be a very different place".

The Caldera[[edit]]

The caldera, being the site where history "literally began" and the exact centre of the meta-structure of history, is the point where all threads of history converge. During the War, various parties begin to realise that this fact could be exploited. Because the Great Houses are connected to every one of the "threads", it would be possible for anyone with control over the caldera to alter their very identity, down to their history and their language. This drives the Houses to become increasingly paranoid about the possibility of an enemy incursion on the Homeworld, the driving force behind the Nine Homeworlds project.

However, the caldera's strategic position also has its uses. There is at least "one abortive attempt" to introduce "foreign matter" into the caldera to make the Houses stronger. Furthermore, they begin to make increased use of the way that, "at least in theory," machinery connected to the caldera could be used to draw out information from any part of space-time and predict how any given alteration to causality would pan out. It is even theorised that it could be used as an ad hoc communication network, although this is somewhat dubious given that the message would warp history on its way down a "thread".

The Book's entry on the caldera ends on speculation of what would happen if the War were to take an unexpected turn involving the Homeworld being "removed" from physical reality along with the caldera: it theorises that only non-worlds like the Eleven-Day Empire or Mictlan would be likely to remain unscathed.

The Eleven-Day Empire[[edit]]

James Thomson III visits a location where he has a vision of a London whose sky burns red even though none of it is actually burning. Thomson sees the black silhouettes of buildings such as the Abbey of Westminster and the throne of Parliament, but, when he runs into one of them for shelter, finds that they are insubstantial and realises that they are "the ghosts of buildings each had burnt".

Thomson's summary of these events in his Journals, published in 1905, prefaces the Book's entry on the location itself: the Faction's stronghold known as the Eleven-Day Empire. Its story begins in 1752, a year when Britain is "the most significant nation on the face of the Earth", being, if not necessarily the most powerful country on Earth, at least wildly successful economically, and a model state by the canons of the Age of Reason. Its cultural shift involves industrialisation (one particular pocket watch manufactured in 1752 will one day go on to be used by the Great Houses during the babel project for symbolic reasons), but also the growing conceptualisation of time by the population.

The overall cultural shift ends up calling for an update from the old Julian calendar to the modern Gregorian calendar. Catching up means the country will skip directly from the night of 2 September to the morning 14 September. This causes riots among those in the population who believe that eleven days are genuinely being taken from their lifetime — but despite widespread ridicule, these people have a point. The days do in fact go somewhere: namely, they are ceremonially purchased by Grandfather Paradox from King George II as part of the Gregorian Compact. Although this provides the Faction with a spare bolthole, it is also an experiment to prove that the Grandfather can circumvent the Great Houses' version of seeing time and use the same technique, albeit on a smaller scale, to bring other perspectives on time into reality. Naturally, although he has yet to officially rebel at this point, the Grandfather does not tell the Ruling Houses quite how he achieved this, let alone how to access the Empire.

The resulting alter-space is dubbed, "not without irony", the Eleven-Day Empire. To be able to use it, as they have done by the time of the Book's writing, for "over four hundred years", the Faction "burn" space-time from beyond the borders of London to extend the survival of London itself. The city proves more than sufficient, however, as most of the Faction's field agents never visit the Empire itself, remaining in cabals spread across the Spiral Politic: by and large, only the Mothers and Fathers and their "personal students and attendants" reside in the Empire on a perennial basis, even after the House Military's Second Wave forces more of the elite to take refuge in the Empire than before. Interestingly, the Empire's buildings do not necessarily mimic the buildings of 1752; the Parliament buildings are the post-1832, rebuilt ones, which is, accoridng to Morlock, because the modern buildings "cast longer shadows".

With no means of accessing it known to anyone external to the Faction (the existence of such sites as Fashion Paradox in the real London being widely understood as more of a case of subconscious influence than of literal portals between the two Londons), the Empire remains extremely secure. As of the Book's writing, the only attempt to invade the Empire was the "ill-fated" 1834 Clockwork Ouroboros affair, and the Military Wing's deployment of "armed flyers" to guard the city is widely thought to be a pointless gesture.

Fashion Paradox, London[[edit]]

From its earliest recorded history, the London parish of St. Giles-in-the-Field seems designed to appeal to Faction Paradox sensibilities: first a carnival venue and, later, home to the gallows of St. Giles' Circus and their symbolic Resurrection Gate, it is also where the first victims of the plague are found in 1664. A century later, it is where the Gregorian Compact was signed by agents of House Paradox and agents of George II, bringing the Eleven-Day Empire into existence. It continues to be a site of carnivalesque death thereafter, becoming the location of he "fatal beer-flood of 1818". By the 21st century, the exact location where the Compact was sealed, now located on New Oxford Street between a fantasy bookshop and a marijuana café, an "unlikely memorial" to Faction Paradox, of uncertain origin, has emerged: a "goth, retro and fetishist clothing store" named Fashion Paradox, seemingly by pure coincidence. Its shop window is adorned with "mannequins of indeterminate sex" who are, every Halloween, decorated with skull masks.

The Gregorian Compact[[edit]]

As documented in the secret records of the Service, shortly before the United Kingdom officially switches from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar, a delegation of House Paradox emerges in 18th century Portsmouth, led by one of Grandfather Paradox’s four original Godfather-lieutenants. The Grandfather’s choice of the 18th century as this point of contact is the subject of much subsequent speculation, but may have been driven by the fact that this era is the heyday of the Caribbean voodoo cults to which the Faction’s own witchcraft is often compared.

At any rate, the Faction envoys, perceived as a foreign dignitaries from somewhere in "the lands of the east", are given a warm welcome, with a first reception being held where the Godfather first emerged. Later, a second is held at St. James's Palace in London, "much to the Star Chamber’s alarm". There, the Godfather performs what is recorded as "an amusement", performing a Shadow Dance with the four arms his shadow possessed, each wielding a different weapon. He then has a lengthy discussion with the King himself, discussing the possibility of war between England and the Faction before coming to an agreement, whose exact terms remain obscure as far as what the Faction gave England goes.

On the Faction’s end, the British are given "sufficient ritual methods to remove the lost even days when the calendar changed from the Julian to the Gregorian version in September"; House Paradox then literally takes away the excised days, using them to create the Eleven-Day Empire, supposedly "the first alter-time environment to be set apart from the history dictated by the Great Houses". Subsequently, the Gregorian Compact gains notoriety among War powers as "the first ‘official’ pact between House (later Faction) Paradox and humanity".

History[[edit]]

The difference between "History" and "Time" is highlighted, with the former having a strong psychological component and having been laid down (alongside "many of the 'natural' laws of creation") at the anchoring of the thread as part of the Protocols of the Great Houses. The Houses effectively "built" history, "engineering it as a complex memetic structure running through the entire length of observed time", although "certain parts of the far future" remained beyond their reach. Every sentient species has its own history, but (with "certain key exceptions") they are all "supported" by the "infrastructure set into the universe itself" by the "deeper" Protocols. With their bodies directly linked to "the continuum itself", the children fo the Great Houses are in a very real sense "part of time"; thus, some observe that their greater consideration with the preservation of history than with the preservation of life is almost an acknowledgement "that they're made out of pure history themselves".

The Book speculates that "if history is the stuff of which they’re made, then the constant skirmishes between Faction Paradox and the other Houses are basically racial struggles", since a modification to the structure of history, such as those the Faction typically tries to enact, is by definition an addition to the Houses' gene-pool. It also highlights the fact that linear history is not the only way one could choose to perceive time, as evidenced by non-linear cultures, and points out that humanity was well on its way to becoming such a culture in the 21st century, only to turn away from that path with such abruptness that it "could be argued" that this decline must have been "organised by outside forces specifically to stop this happening".

The Imperator Presidency[[edit]]

Around 1200 years before the War, after a long period of stagnancy which is widely reported as lasting ten million years, mysterious "faults" begin to appear in the Homeworld's supposedly-infallible breeding-engines. The cause of the malfunction is extremely mysterious, given that the Homeworld's "unusual relationship to the rest of time" was meant to "prime" it to "resist entropy": if a flaw existed in the biodata within the machines, then "such flaws must have been present in the systems for far longer than anyone had liked to imagine". Either way it produces a number of "eccentricities" among the new generation of archons, including "four major 'mutations'", including the future War King and Grandfather Paradox.

Initially, "very little [is] said" about the abnormal loomings; having "no experience of even admitting that somthing might be wrong", the ruling Houses are left to assume that "the great academies of the Houses" will be able to "iron out any little problems in its new members' biodata". Three hundred years later, however, these hopes are proven wrong when one of the major mutations, a scion of House Dvora, ascends to the Presidency and takes on the title of the Imperator. Becoming a "brutal, mono-maniacal God-Emperor", he orders military involvement in the affairs of the lesser species and tries to spearhead an effort to preemptively unmake and recreate the Protocols and structure of history, with the aim of "adapting" history to better suit the Houses' own needs, and particularly the Dvoras'.

Developing a cult of personality, whose most surprising trait is that the archon even has sufficient personality to form a cult around, he recruits followers from the lesser species by "playing on their expectations that the rulers of the Houses would be inscrutable, unstoppable Gods". However, the overly destructive nature of his crusade eventually leads his own Order of the Weal to "denounce" him among the other Houses. Undeterred, he "simply remove[s] his loyal supporters from the Homeworld altogether" and continues his intergalactic war with his army of followers and mercenaries. For the first time in their history, the Homeworlders find themselves the centre of attention among other spacefaring species. Though in their helpless panic it takes them "an absurdly long time" to formulate a reaction, they eventually decide to make a "desperate attempt to pacify the Spiral Politic" by capturing and executing the Imperator, so that the outside universe will see that its newly-uncovered "gods" have a "code of justice", and thereby be dissuaded from attacking the Homeworld directly in reprisal for the Imperator's actions.

Allegedly "the first deliberate killing of a Great House member since the foundation of House society", this rash decision shocks the other Houses to their core, and almost seems to validate the Imperator's own violent ideology. The "Imperator crisis" goes on to "trigger the rise of the intervention groups" and "fuel the creation of Faction Paradox", being viewed in hindsight as "the moment of catastrophe for the Houses", possibly a portent or retro-reflection of "the futur War itself"; more broadly, it precipitates a "thaw" of stagnant House society in subsequent centuries, with political alliances forming and shifting at an unprecedented pace, and thoughts of war and violence that would have been unthinkable a thousand years prior becoming commonplace by the final years leading up to the War.

The Imperator himself would no doubt have been proud."The Imperator Presidency", The Book of the War

Intervention[[edit]]

In the aftermath of the Imperator crisis, due to the Protocols of Linearity, the Homeworld finds itself with a live, "real-time" connection to the various eras touched by the Imperator's crusade, a situation which fosters increasing paranoia among the Great Houses. A number of Newbloods declare that they "should intervene in the affairs of the lesser species before they intervene in ours". Soon the Homeworld becomes rife with "intervention groups wanting diplomatic relations with the lesser species, intervention groups wanting complete control of the lesser species, counter-intervention groups like the Imperator’s own bastard offspring the Order of the Weal", and even greater disturbances follow, including the foundation of House Paradox and the brief instutition of a rival Presidency on the "semi-developed world" of Dronid.

Eventually, even the Ruling Houses themselves catch the intervention "bug" and organise official, legal interventions in the timestreams — mainly to begin to fight the unknown outside force whose influence they are beginning to detect in the Spiral Politic, in a blind, chaotic fashion which mostly amounts to sending House agents to cripple or even erase any species which shows signs of developing serious temporal technology of its own. In fact, although popularly viewed as a repressive measure against revolutionary tendencies, the eventual imprisonment of House Paradox's founder-Grandfather could just as easily be seen "as a sign that the ruling Houses were now prepared to be utterly pragmatic in their attempts to keep the Homeworld under control".

Regardless, as the War looms closer, the "most influential" faction of interventionists remove themselves from the Homeworld to become the Lords of the Celestis, forever staining the overall legacy of the pre-War interventionists as "traitors, the irst rats to desert the sinking ship".

Protocols of Linearity[[edit]]

The Protocols of Linearity are the most frequently discussed out of the many Protocols of the Great Houses, dictating the limits by which the Great Houses abide in the process of time travel. Chiefly, these Protocols state that it is forbidden to travel backwards in the Homeworld's own history, and also that "whenever Homeworld-time meets outside-time, the two should become analogous" such that "if an agent of one of the Houses leaves the Homeworld for, say, five years then when he returns home he’ll ind that ive years have passed there as well". In the context of the War, both the Houses and the enemy mysteriously seem to abide by Linearity in nearly all cases (as evidenced by the fact that the pre-War capture of Compassion on the orders of the War King would have been much more successful if the House agent despatched for the purpose had been willing to use time-travel to look in all possible hiding places of Compassion's "at once"). There is much speculation as to why this might be, from the Houses being unable to free themselves from such deeply-held Laws even if they wanted to, to a secret agreement between the Houses and the enemy on the rules of engagement, to both sides simply fearing the consequences of the escalation this would represent.

Loa[[edit]]

While the Great Houses model the workings of time and history as "high-order mathematical structures" which are "certainly complex" but, provided one has access to "a large enough computer, say, one capable of decrypting entire universes", ultimately "explicable as nothing more than numbers". Faction Paradox, however, champions the view that the processes of time are sufficiently complex as to be sentient: time is "occupied, even guarded by entities", intangible spirit which they term loa after the similar beings posited by Earth voodoo, able to "protect, beguile, curse and possess anybody who tries to cross their boundaries".

The Book's narration points out that viewing history as a mass of living organisms would make a lot of sense, as "if history evolves, then it’d certainly explain how the Houses can now be at War even though they specifically designed history to make War impossible". How literally the knowingly-campy Faction take this is a matter of some debate, especially given that "elder members such as Godfather Morlock have been known to invent loa out of thin air whenever necessary", but in any event the Faction's rituals typically work by attempting to "prime" the loa, and a great clustering of them are said to guard the Eleven-Day Empire.

Some Faction agents who have "studied the culture of the lesser species" have also come to theorise that culturally-significant figures from fictional heroes to minor celebrities can also be thought of as "mythic, symbolic entit[ies], with an existence beyond the material world", capable of influencing individuals' behaviours in very deep ways; taking literally the notion that this makes all these figures "minor loa" in their own right is what leads the Faction to create the Remote.

London (Eighteenth Century)[[edit]]

Although commonly thought of as a duplicate of 18th century London, the Eleven-Day Empire's geography is somewhat more complex, being an anachronistic accumulation of symbols including anything from the 20th century MI6 building, where the Faction develops new weapons, to a version of Trafalgar Square where a statue of Grandfather Paradox has replaced Lord Nelson's and the lions have been turned into sphinxes wearing Faction Paradox masks. Of particular notice are "the Stacks", the Empire's ghost of the London Underground, where Morlock makes his lair directly beneath the Natural History Museum. Furthermore, it must be remembered that of the 18th century's three genuinely distinct cities which would go on to make up "London" — Southwark, Westminster, and the City of London proper — the Faction only controls Westminster, with the shadow-City being the domain of the Unkindnesses.

Godfather Morlock[[edit]]

to be written

House Paradox[[edit]]

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Recruitment (Faction Paradox)[[edit]]

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Ritual (Faction Paradox)[[edit]]

to be written

The Act of Severance[[edit]]

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Sombras que Corta[[edit]]

to be written

The Stacks[[edit]]

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Father Stendec[[edit]]

to be written

Tower Hill[[edit]]

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The Unkindnesses[[edit]]

to be written

New Palace of Westminster[[edit]]

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The History of Earth[[edit]]

The Analytical Engine[[edit]]

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The Book of Enoch[[edit]]

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Captain Sir Burton[[edit]]

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George Gordon, Sixth Baron Byron of Rochdale[[edit]]

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Ada Byron[[edit]]

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Canon per Tonos[[edit]]

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The Clockwork Ouroboro s[[edit]]

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The Eleven-Day Empire: The 1834 Attack[[edit]]

to be written

Ghost Clusters[[edit]]

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The Grand Families[[edit]]

to be written

Grindlay's Warehouse[[edit]]

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Grotesques[[edit]]

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Karachi[[edit]]

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Liber Sanguisugarum[[edit]]

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Mal'akh[[edit]]

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The Maltese Incident[[edit]]

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The Mountains of the Moon[[edit]]

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The Musical Offering[[edit]]

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Napoleonic Era[[edit]]

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The "Princess of Parallelograms" Letters[[edit]]

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The Shelley Cabal[[edit]]

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The Society of St George[[edit]]

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John Hanning Speke[[edit]]

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The Star Chamber[[edit]]

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The Walking Dead[[edit]]

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House Xianthellipse[[edit]]

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Robert Scarratt[[edit]]

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The A-Z of the War[[edit]]

House Strategist Entarodora[[edit]]

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"Monsters" Coda[[edit]]

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Xenoprediction[[edit]]

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"You" Diversions[[edit]]

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"Probability" Doctrine[[edit]]

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Confusion[[edit]]

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Utterlost[[edit]]

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Zero Time[[edit]]

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Gravity Spiders[[edit]]

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Time-thickening[[edit]]

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Apportation[[edit]]

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Women (Dressing Up As)[[edit]]

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Nechronomancers[[edit]]

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HEM (Highest Entropy Matter)[[edit]]

to be written

Ordifica[[edit]]

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Intercreationals[[edit]]

to be written

Leviathans[[edit]]

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Quintessence[[edit]]

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Redemption Cult[[edit]]

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Forced Regen Missions[[edit]]

to be written

D-Mat[[edit]]

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Burlesque Devices[[edit]]

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"Killerbots" (Autonomic)[[edit]]

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Vaccinations (Temporal)[[edit]]

to be written

Houses and Orders[[edit]]

to be written

Jungle Children[[edit]]

to be written

Hauserkinder[[edit]]

to be written

"Justine's Story"[[edit]]

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House Arpexia[[edit]]

to be written

Babels[[edit]]

to be written

Casts[[edit]]

to be written

House Catherion[[edit]]

to be written

House Ixion[[edit]]

to be written

Lethean Campaign[[edit]]

to be written

Order of the Weal[[edit]]

to be written

Chatelaine Thessalia[[edit]]

to be written

War Predictions[[edit]]

to be written

War Predictions: Chatelaine Thessalia[[edit]]

to be written

Zo la Domini[[edit]]

to be written

The History of the Homeworld[[edit]]

Closed Session (of the Ruling Houses)[[edit]]

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The Closed Session from House Dvora's Account[[edit]]

to be written

Dronid[[edit]]

to be written

House Dvora[[edit]]

to be written

The Enemy[[edit]]

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The Faraway Declaration[[edit]]

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The First Message from the Enemy[[edit]]

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The Head of the Presidency[[edit]]

to be written

The Homeworld[[edit]]

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House Lineacrux[[edit]]

to be written

The Nine Homeworlds[[edit]]

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Noosphere[[edit]]

to be written

The Presidency[[edit]]

to be written

Protocols of the Great Houses[[edit]]

to be written

Regen-Inf[[edit]]

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The Ruling Houses[[edit]]

to be written

Sex[[edit]]

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Space (Five Famous Battles)[[edit]]

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Timeships[[edit]]

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Laura Tobin[[edit]]

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Academician Umbaste[[edit]]

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The War King[[edit]]

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The War King's Inaugural Address[[edit]]

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Carmen Yeh[[edit]]

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Appendix III: Carmen Yeh's "Fantastical Travels in an Infinite Universe"[[edit]]

to be written

Compassion[[edit]]

to be written

The History of Posthumanity[[edit]]

Earth:History[[edit]]

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Earth Chronology (1431 to 2001 AD)[[edit]]

to be written

Posthumanity[[edit]]

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Praxis[[edit]]

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Siloportem[[edit]]

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Time-Travel: Posthuman[[edit]]

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War Predictions: The Rivera Manuscript[[edit]]

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Appendix IV: Notes on the Rivera Manuscript[[edit]]

to be written

The Academician's Story[[edit]]

Academicians for Game Logic[[edit]]

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Academician Devonire[[edit]]

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Grandfather Paradox (Representations)[[edit]]

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The Grandfather's Arm[[edit]]

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Kaiwar[[edit]]

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Paradox Anxiety[[edit]]

to be written

The Thousand-Year Battles[[edit]]

to be written

Waves of the House Military[[edit]]

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Appendix I: The Beginning of the War (A Chronology)[[edit]]

to be written

The Non-History of the Celestis[[edit]]

Anarchitects[[edit]]

to be written

Chaotic Limiter[[edit]]

to be written

Conceptual Entities[[edit]]

to be written

Fluxes[[edit]]

to be written

Gargoyles[[edit]]

to be written

Meme[[edit]]

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Mictlan[[edit]]

to be written

Order of the Dragon[[edit]]

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The Ottoman Purges[[edit]]

to be written

Sacrifice[[edit]]

to be written

Shifts[[edit]]

to be written

The Shift's Story[[edit]]

Beshielach[[edit]]

to be written

Dating War Era Events (Difficulties)[[edit]]

to be written

The Greater Autrobulan Franchise[[edit]]

to be written

The Lords Celestial[[edit]]

to be written

Memeovore[[edit]]

to be written

Planetesimals[[edit]]

to be written

Personality Reboots[[edit]]

to be written

Worldofme[[edit]]

to be written

The City of the Saved[[edit]]

City of the Saved[[edit]]

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The Timebeast Assault[[edit]]

to be written

Former Citizen Verrifant[[edit]]

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House Mirraflex[[edit]]

to be written

Lady Armourer Mantissa[[edit]]

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Het Linc[[edit]]

to be written

Secret Architects (of the City of the Saved)[[edit]]

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Uptime Gate[[edit]]

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Amanda Legend Lefcourt[[edit]]

to be written

Gargil Krymtorpor[[edit]]

to be written

Ghetto of the Damned[[edit]]

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Lord Foaming Sky[[edit]]

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Order of the Iron Soul[[edit]]

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Cousin Pinocchio[[edit]]

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The Rump Parliament[[edit]]

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Father Timon[[edit]]

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House Halfling[[edit]]

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The Piltdown Mob[[edit]]

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Sons of Tepes[[edit]]

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The Impaler's Story[[edit]]

Tirgoviste[[edit]]

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Ulterior Worlds[[edit]]

to be written

Vlad III of Wallachia[[edit]]

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Wallachia[[edit]]

to be written

Djinn[[edit]]

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The Edimmu[[edit]]

to be written

Gragov[[edit]]

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Lord Halved Birth[[edit]]

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Investigators[[edit]]

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Investigator Thirty-One[[edit]]

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Mark of Indenture[[edit]]

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The Poenari Relic[[edit]]

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Grigori Efimovitch Rasputin[[edit]]

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The Thirteen-Day Republic[[edit]]

Cousin-Thrice-Removed Anastasia[[edit]]

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The Cult of Celebrity Death[[edit]]

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Father-Twice-Removed Dyavol[[edit]]

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The House of Lords[[edit]]

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The Malachite Room[[edit]]

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Cousin-Once-Removed Nadim[[edit]]

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Cousin Octavia[[edit]]

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The Red Burial[[edit]]

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Removal of Members[[edit]]

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The Thirteen-Day Republic[[edit]]

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Battle of Valentine's Day[[edit]]

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The Winter Palace[[edit]]

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Witch-blood[[edit]]

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Labyrinths[[edit]]

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Biodata[[edit]]

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The Diaspora[[edit]]

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Eremites[[edit]]

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Faction Precursors[[edit]]

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Mrs. Foyle[[edit]]

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The House of the Rising Sun[[edit]]

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Labyrinths[[edit]]

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The Remonstration Bureau[[edit]]

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Voodoo Charter[[edit]]

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The Venue Accords[[edit]]

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Weaponstores (Remote)[[edit]]

to be written

The Ghost Dance[[edit]]

A'daltem Ano'nde[[edit]]

to be written

Cousin Belial[[edit]]

to be written

Catch-the-Bear's War Bonnet[[edit]]

to be written

Ghost Shirts[[edit]]

to be written

North American Warrior Tribes[[edit]]

to be written

Nunaha'wu[[edit]]

to be written

Open Doors[[edit]]

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Pai'ngya[[edit]]

to be written

Peyote Dream Runners[[edit]]

to be written

Sand and Snow Ammunition[[edit]]

to be written

Tenskwatawa[[edit]]

to be written

Appendix II: From the North American Journals of Cousin Belial[[edit]]

to be written

The History of the Remote[[edit]]

Anchormen[[edit]]

to be written

The Broken Remote[[edit]]

to be written

Fallahal[[edit]]

to be written

The Jallama Reed Transmissions[[edit]]

to be written

The New Young Gods[[edit]]

to be written

Remembrance Tanks[[edit]]

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Shadow-Masks[[edit]]

to be written

Simia-KK98[[edit]]

to be written

The Viewers and Listeners Protocols[[edit]]

to be written

Wovoka[[edit]]

to be written

Faction Hollywood[[edit]]

to be written

Michael Brookhaven[[edit]]

to be written

Brookhaven: A Filmography[[edit]]

to be written

Brookhaven's Follies[[edit]]

to be written

Christopher Rodonanté Cwej[[edit]]

to be written

Cwejen[[edit]]

to be written

Faction Hollywood[[edit]]

to be written

The Fat[[edit]]

to be written

The Gauntlet[[edit]]

to be written

GCI Processor[[edit]]

to be written

Hollow Spectaculars[[edit]]

to be written

Brookhaven's Ghost Kingdom: The Six Central Characters[[edit]]

to be written

The Hollywood Bowl Shooting[[edit]]

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The House of the Seven Gables[[edit]]

to be written

The Mount Usu Duel[[edit]]

to be written

"The Mystery of Edwin Drood"[[edit]]

to be written

The North Los Angeles Cabal[[edit]]

to be written

Order of the White Peacock[[edit]]

to be written

Production Hell[[edit]]

to be written

"Through the Eye of Eternity"[[edit]]

to be written

Chad Vandemeer[[edit]]

to be written

The End[[edit]]

"Briefings"[[edit]]

to be written

Humanity[[edit]]

to be written

Nanotechnology[[edit]]

to be written

Ronald Bela Nevitz[[edit]]

to be written

Time-Travel: Biodata Principle[[edit]]

to be written

The Younger World Story[[edit]]

to be written

Coda[[edit]]

House Lolita[[edit]]

to be written

House Tracolix[[edit]]

to be written

Parablox[[edit]]

to be written

Characters[[edit]]

Mentioned only[[edit]]

Worldbuilding[[edit]]

Notes[[edit]]

  • While editing The Book of the War, Lawrence Miles described it as "a continuity in a book, it's an encyclopaedia to the War Era universe. It's got a structure rather than a plot, the way history's got a structure or a Bible's got a structure. Some parts of the universe are cross-referenced with other parts, and it all comes together to make up this great big … vision."[3]
  • Miles carefully structured the book so it could also be understood if the entries were read in alphabetical order: at one point, he specifically requested that Jonathan Dennis rename a character to move the respective entry in the book.[4] The entries in several sections of the Design Specs reading order were notably given in alphabetical order.[2]
  • With the inclusion of the prior and subsequent entries, "Robert Scarratt" and "Jungle Children", the A-Z of the War section does indeed includes one entry for every letter of the alphabet. In the original "Design Spec" document, the nonexistent entry "Scarratt's Group" was included in this section as an intentional error.
  • Miles was selective regarding which concepts were borrowed from the Doctor Who universe, particularly with regards to alien species. For instance, he had permission from the Robert Holmes estate to use the Sontarans, who had previously appeared in his The Faction Paradox Protocols audio stories, but he decided they weren't necessary.[5] In contrast, he obtained permission from Neil Penswick to use the Yssgaroth from The Pit, because, even though the concept was generic, Miles described "Yssgaroth" as "the best name I've ever heard".[6]
  • Besides its continuity connections to the Doctor Who universe, The Book of the War also included references to many stories from other genres and fictional universes:
  • Lawrence Miles briefly considered releasing an expanded version of The Book of the War on CD-ROM.[7] Though Mad Norwegian Press' other Faction Paradox books would be later be released as ebooks, CEO Lars Pearson said that the number of permissions that would be needed from the contributors made it untenable.[5]
  • The entry for the City of the Saved quotes a traveller's lyrical description of the City as "an urban sprawl the size of a spiral galaxy… a fabulous shimmering lightscape nonillions of miles across". This traveller was intended to be Iris Wildthyme.[8]
  • The Book of the War won three awards from the Jade Pagoda mailing list in 2002: Best Anthology; Best Short Story, for the Mujun: The Ghost Kingdom-related entries; and, for its use of Faction Paradox, Best Returning Character or Concept.[9]

Who wrote what?[[edit]]

Simon Bucher-Jones, Daniel O'Mahony, Ian McIntire, Mags L. Halliday, Helen Fayle, Philip Purser-Hallard, Kelly Hale, Jonathan Dennis, Mark Clapham, and Lars Pearson[1] all contributed material to the book. Each contributors mostly worked on their stories independently, only discovering Lawrence Miles's added intersections with other stories once the book was released. It was deliberately kept unclear as to which authors contributed which entries, but later releases provided some clues.

Unincluded entries[[edit]]

The book credits Lance Parkin, David A. McIntee, and Eddie Robson as writers who "wanted to play but whose material didn't quite fit anywhere".

Additionally, Simon Bucher-Jones wrote two extra entries, "Protective Neotony" and "Instant Animals", for the proposed CD-ROM expansion of the book; after the cancellation of that project, he published the entries on his blog.[7] Bucher-Jones returned to the concepts from "Protective Neotony" in his 2018 Faction Paradox short story The Short Briefing Sergeant's Tale as the "Hausanthropic equations".

Continuity[[edit]]

External links[[edit]]

Footnotes[[edit]]