Aliases of the Doctor

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Ian Chesterton and Barbara Wright meet "Dr Foreman". (TV: "An Unearthly Child" [+]Part of An Unearthly Child, Loading...{"namedep":"An Unearthly Child (1)","1":"An Unearthly Child (TV story)"})

Throughout their travels in time and space, the Doctor took on and was called by a number of different aliases, titles and names. Some were fleeting, while others, like John Smith, were used by almost all of their incarnations, with some variations. The Doctor told very few people their original name, instead asking others to simply call them the Doctor. By many accounts, the Doctor considered this title to be their real name. (TV: The Name of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Name of the Doctor (TV story)"] et al.) It was their chosen identity, and a promise to the universe. (TV: The Sound of Drums [+]Loading...["The Sound of Drums (TV story)"], The Beast Below [+]Loading...["The Beast Below (TV story)"], The Day of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Day of the Doctor (TV story)"])

In other accounts, however, the Doctor's "true name" was the one which was hidden, a guarded secret the Doctor kept from almost everyone. (TV: The Girl in the Fireplace [+]Loading...["The Girl in the Fireplace (TV story)"], The Shakespeare Code [+]Loading...["The Shakespeare Code (TV story)"], The Fires of Pompeii [+]Loading...["The Fires of Pompeii (TV story)"], The Time of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Time of the Doctor (TV story)"]) Most names the Doctor kept were a matter of convenience, and they were prone to take on whichever name would help them blend in best, or stand out more, depending on the situation. Some companions felt this was not the Doctor's strongest suit, however. (AUDIO: What Just Happened? [+]Loading...["What Just Happened? (audio story)"] et al.)

The Doctor's real name[[edit]]

This section's awfully stubby.

Information from Return of the Living Dad [+]Loading...["Return of the Living Dad (novel)"]

Most accounts treated the Doctor's true name as a complete mystery. Bill Potts, his student, asserted that "nobody [knew] the Doctor's real name", although Missy claimed that she was an exception to this given that she "grew up with him". (TV: World Enough and Time [+]Loading...["World Enough and Time (TV story)"]) One account even implied that their given name was ceremoniously withdrawn and stricken by their Cousins as punishment for a disgrace the Doctor had brought upon their House. (PROSE: Lungbarrow [+]Loading...["Lungbarrow (novel)"]) However, the Doctor's true name did appear in secret files created by the High Court of the Time Lords, containing a transcript of the Doctor's trial, where it was spelled as "∂³Σx²". (PROSE: The Trial of Doctor Who [+]Loading...["The Trial of Doctor Who (short story)"]) While wandering in the Doctor's TARDIS, Clara Oswald read a history of the Time War which apparently told her the Doctor's name, causing her to remark "So that's who." (TV: Journey to the Centre of the TARDIS [+]Loading...["Journey to the Centre of the TARDIS (TV story)"])

Even when put on trial by the Time Lords, they were only referred to as "the Doctor", (TV: The War Games [+]Loading...["The War Games (TV story)"]) although the Valeyard, a culmination of the Doctor's darker side who prosecuted the second trial, acknowledged that this was an alias. (TV: The Mysterious Planet [+]Loading...["The Mysterious Planet (TV story)"]) When the Fifth Doctor was officially inducted as Lord President, he declared that it was "out of the question" for him to be introduced by his true name, stating that he would accept being introduced as "Lord President Doctor". (AUDIO: Time in Office [+]Loading...["Time in Office (audio story)"]) Even those who had known them in childhood addressed them only as "the Doctor", such as the Master, (TV: Death in Heaven [+]Loading...["Death in Heaven (TV story)"]) and the Rani. (COMIC: Weapons of Past Destruction [+]Loading...["Weapons of Past Destruction (comic story)"])

According to one account, during their first incarnation, the Doctor adopted this name in dealing with human colonists on the planet Iwa at the same time that his granddaughter adopted the name "Susan". (PROSE: Frayed [+]Loading...["Frayed (novel)"]) Other accounts implied that the Doctor's title had been chosen as a Gallifreyan custom, (TV: The Sound of Drums [+]Loading...["The Sound of Drums (TV story)"]) and that he had been using it before he left Gallifrey. (TV: The Name of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Name of the Doctor (TV story)"], World Enough and Time [+]Loading...["World Enough and Time (TV story)"])

The Doctor's real name has been said to be difficult to pronounce, for humans at least, (PROSE: Doctor Who and the Auton Invasion [+]Loading...["Doctor Who and the Auton Invasion (novelisation)"], AUDIO: Slipback [+]Loading...["Slipback (audio story)"]) and certainly for adults, (TV: Twice Upon a Time [+]Loading...["Twice Upon a Time (TV story)"]) possessing thirty eight syllables. (PROSE: SLEEPY [+]Loading...["SLEEPY (novel)"]) The First Doctor once told an interrogator he "wouldn't be able to pronounce the first syllable of [his name]." (PROSE: Salvation [+]Loading...["Salvation (novel)"]) His seventh incarnation likewise told one of his captors that he "doubt[ed] [they]'d be able to pronounce the name [he] was originally given." (PROSE: Illegal Alien [+]Loading...["Illegal Alien (novel)"]) When asked about the Doctor's name, Peri Brown once said that the Doctor had told her she would find it unpronounceable. (AUDIO: Slipback [+]Loading...["Slipback (audio story)"]) Moments before his regeneration, however, the Twelfth Doctor stated his belief that "children [could] hear [his name]", but only when "their hearts [were] in the right place, and the stars [were] too." (TV: Twice Upon a Time [+]Loading...["Twice Upon a Time (TV story)"])

The Doctor kept their true name hidden despite numerous "mind-probe" attempts and the effect of a truth field. (TV: The Girl in the Fireplace [+]Loading...["The Girl in the Fireplace (TV story)"], The Time of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Time of the Doctor (TV story)"]) The Carrionite Lilith, unable to discover the Tenth Doctor's true name even with the "witchcraft" used by her kind, remarked that "there [was] no name," and that the Doctor was hiding it in despair. (TV: The Shakespeare Code [+]Loading...["The Shakespeare Code (TV story)"]) The psychically-gifted Evelina, who attempted to foretell the Doctor's future, remarked that his "true name" was "hidden" from her. (TV: The Fires of Pompeii [+]Loading...["The Fires of Pompeii (TV story)"])

By one account, in his youth, the Doctor had outright removed his name from time, all but he and the Master forgetting his birth name. (AUDIO: Blood of the Time Lords [+]Loading...["Blood of the Time Lords (audio story)"])

Significance[[edit]]

By one account, names held mystic importance in Time Lord society, meaning that all Time Lords kept their true names as closely-guarded secrets. In this sense, the Doctor's name was not any more or less significant than any other Time Lord's. (PROSE: Doctor Who and the Auton Invasion [+]Loading...["Doctor Who and the Auton Invasion (novelisation)"])

The Eleventh Doctor told Clara Oswald that his original name was not important since he specifically chose the title of "Doctor" to take its place, saying it was "like a promise [one made]." (TV: The Name of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Name of the Doctor (TV story)"]) This promise was; "Never cruel or cowardly. Never give up, never give in." (TV: The Day of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Day of the Doctor (TV story)"]) Even Clara considered "the Doctor" to be his true name and the only one that mattered. (TV: The Time of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Time of the Doctor (TV story)"]) Despite their hatred of the War Doctor's actions, (TV: The Name of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Name of the Doctor (TV story)"]) both the tenth and eleventh incarnations admitted "[he] was the Doctor more than [any of them]." (TV: The Day of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Day of the Doctor (TV story)"]) When Clara was forced to take on his role for him, the Twelfth Doctor told her that "goodness has nothing to do with [being a Doctor]". (TV: Flatline [+]Loading...["Flatline (TV story)"])

The Doctor considered abandoning his name if he felt he had to do something highly immoral. (TV: The Beast Below [+]Loading...["The Beast Below (TV story)"], Face the Raven [+]Loading...["Face the Raven (TV story)"]) The War Doctor rejected the name to fight in the Time War, (TV: The Night of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Night of the Doctor (TV story)"]) but proudly called himself the Doctor once he was given the chance to end the conflict without killing the Time Lords. (TV: The Day of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Day of the Doctor (TV story)"]) During his final day, the Twelfth Doctor stated being "the Doctor" was being kind, even if it meant pulling a self-sacrifice to bring others a small amount of extra time to live. (TV: The Doctor Falls [+]Loading...["The Doctor Falls (TV story)"]) The Thirteenth Doctor said that a "bit of adrenaline, dash of outrage and a hint of panic" helped her to remember she was the Doctor. (TV: The Woman Who Fell to Earth [+]Loading...["The Woman Who Fell to Earth (TV story)"])

The Saxon Master knew of this and implied that the Doctor's title had been chosen because it meant "the man who makes people better", although he found the choice "sanctimonious" for someone who ended millions of lives and ruined many others. (TV: The Sound of Drums [+]Loading...["The Sound of Drums (TV story)"]) River Song was aware of this contradiction in the Doctor's behaviour: she said that the Doctor was the first to have this title and that the rest of the universe later adopted it, usually to mean "healer" or "wise man". However, she added that, in some parts of the universe, such as in the Gamma Forests, it eventually came to mean "mighty warrior". (TV: A Good Man Goes to War [+]Loading...["A Good Man Goes to War (TV story)"])

According to Dorium Maldovar, the Silence had a particular interest in the Doctor's name. He explained that if the Doctor lived long enough, "on the fields of Trenzalore, at the fall of the Eleventh, [when] no creature could speak falsely or fail to answer", a question that must never be answered would be asked: "Doctor Who?". The Silence wanted to stop the Doctor from revealing his true name. (TV: The Wedding of River Song [+]Loading...["The Wedding of River Song (TV story)"])

The Doctor was at a later time forced to go to Trenzalore to rescue his friends from the Great Intelligence, which sought to gain access to the Doctor's tomb. The tomb, which was a future version of his own dying TARDIS, would open only to the Doctor's real name. The Intelligence threatened to kill Clara Oswald and the Paternoster Gang if he did not speak his name and open the tomb; the situation was resolved when the data ghost of River Song was able to silently transmit his name to the TARDIS, thus opening the door for the Great Intelligence. (TV: The Name of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Name of the Doctor (TV story)"])

The Doctor's real name became important during the Siege of Trenzalore, as it was the signal chosen by the Time Lords to come back to the universe, broadcasting the question "Doctor Who?" through a crack in reality, simultaneously broadcasting a Truth Field so that they could be sure that it was truly the Doctor responding to them. Despite this, when the Doctor was facing death, Clara told the Time Lords through the Crack that the only name of his that mattered was "the Doctor" and everything he stood for under that name, prompting them to give the Doctor a new regeneration cycle at the cost of closing the crack. (TV: The Time of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Time of the Doctor (TV story)"])

After meeting his twelfth incarnation, the First Doctor was confronted by the mysterious Testimony Foundation, who claimed that the Doctor was the "Doctor of War". Although the First Doctor initially feared this interpretation of his future, after witnessing the Twelfth Doctor's efforts to save Captain Archibald Hamish Lethbridge-Stewart, he came to conclude that the "Doctor of War" was not a man who revelled in war, but a man who sought the moments of peace that existed amid open warfare, and who would always try to find another way to end war, and to find resolution, rather than resorting to bloodshed. (TV: Twice Upon a Time [+]Loading...["Twice Upon a Time (TV story)"])

Ubiquity of the title[[edit]]

The Doctor did possess at least one doctorate. (TV: The Moonbase [+]Loading...["The Moonbase (TV story)"], The Armageddon Factor [+]Loading...["The Armageddon Factor (TV story)"], The Mysterious Planet [+]Loading...["The Mysterious Planet (TV story)"]) They sometimes described themselves as a "doctor of many things" (TV: Four to Doomsday [+]Loading...["Four to Doomsday (TV story)"]) or of "everything", (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Loading...["Spearhead from Space (TV story)"], Utopia [+]Loading...["Utopia (TV story)"]) as well as "a scientist, an engineer, builder of things". (TV: The Aztecs [+]Loading...["The Aztecs (TV story)"]) However, their knowledge was limited to anything prior to the Rassilon Era. (TV: Utopia [+]Loading...["Utopia (TV story)"]) The Eleventh Doctor claimed that one of his doctorates was in cheesemaking, (TV: The God Complex [+]Loading...["The God Complex (TV story)"]) but only the "stinky, blue kind". (PROSE: Shroud of Sorrow [+]Loading...["Shroud of Sorrow (novel)"])

On several occasions, the Doctor claimed they were not a medical doctor. (TV: "The Forest of Fear" [+]Part of An Unearthly Child, Loading...{"namedep":"The Forest of Fear (3)","1":"An Unearthly Child (TV story)"}, "Mighty Kublai Khan" [+]Part of Marco Polo, Loading...{"namedep":"Mighty Kublai Khan (6)","1":"Marco Polo (TV story)"}) Though by their second incarnation, he had studied medicine in the 19th century, (TV: The Moonbase [+]Loading...["The Moonbase (TV story)"]) although Clara recalled the Doctor telling her that he graduated in the wrong century. (TV: Death in Heaven [+]Loading...["Death in Heaven (TV story)"]) The Eleventh Doctor described himself as a medical doctor. (TV: The God Complex [+]Loading...["The God Complex (TV story)"]) The seventh, eleventh and twelfth incarnations displayed some medical knowledge, being able to help with minor injuries (TV: Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Loading...["Remembrance of the Daleks (TV story)"], The Vampires of Venice [+]Loading...["The Vampires of Venice (TV story)"]) and tell if a person was vitamin deficient. (TV: Thin Ice [+]Loading...["Thin Ice (TV story)"]) The Ninth Doctor could also diagnose patients in a hospital ward, quickly deducing they all shared the injuries of a scar on the back of their hands, collapsed chest cavities, crushed rib cages and gas masks fused into the flesh on their faces, (TV: The Empty Child [+]Loading...["The Empty Child (TV story)"]) and displayed extensive knowledge on nanogenes, such as their ability to repair organic matter and restore life as a mere "quirk of matter". (TV: The Doctor Dances [+]Loading...["The Doctor Dances (TV story)"]) The Tenth Doctor in particular proved a proficient medic, performing life-saving surgery on Laszlo, sustaining him as a Human-Pig hybrid, able to live as long as a human again. (TV: Evolution of the Daleks [+]Loading...["Evolution of the Daleks (TV story)"])

When asked by Mabli if her doctorate was in medicine, the Thirteenth Doctor described herself as having a doctorate in "medicine, science, engineering, candyfloss, Lego, philosophy, music, problems, people, [and] hope." (TV: The Tsuranga Conundrum [+]Loading...["The Tsuranga Conundrum (TV story)"])

Individuals with knowledge of the Doctor's name[[edit]]

Susan Foreman knew the Doctor's real name, and wrote it on the wrappings of a hypercube she sent to him after she had settled down on Earth. (PROSE: Ghost of Christmas Past [+]Loading...["Ghost of Christmas Past (short story)"])

The Sixth Doctor told his dance instructor, Becky, his name. (PROSE: Teach Yourself Ballroom Dancing [+]Loading...["Teach Yourself Ballroom Dancing (short story)"])

The Eighth Doctor's companion, Sam Jones, overheard his real name being said. She found it quite alien and virtually unpronounceable. (PROSE: Vanderdeken's Children [+]Loading...["Vanderdeken's Children (novel)"])

When the Tenth Doctor first encountered her, River Song claimed to have known him at some point in his future, (TV: Silence in the Library [+]Loading...["Silence in the Library (TV story)"]) and, to prove her "credentials", she whispered his name in his ear, and apologised for having to do so. The Doctor was shocked at this, as "there [was] only one reason [he] would ever tell anyone [his] name, [and] only one time [he] could." (TV: Forest of the Dead [+]Loading...["Forest of the Dead (TV story)"]) River indicated to Clara Oswald that she "made" the Doctor tell her his name and that "it took a lot of effort". (TV: The Name of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Name of the Doctor (TV story)"])

Near the end of his life, despite believing there was no one left in the universe who knew it, the Tenth Doctor encountered members of an unidentified pan-dimensional race that knew his real name. (AUDIO: The Last Voyage [+]Loading...["The Last Voyage (audio story)"])

While separated from the Eleventh Doctor, Clara Oswald read his name in The History of the Time War. Though that timeline was aborted, leaving her with no memory of it, (TV: Journey to the Centre of the TARDIS [+]Loading...["Journey to the Centre of the TARDIS (TV story)"]) she later began to recall certain moments of the timeline, (TV: The Name of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Name of the Doctor (TV story)"]) and claimed to know the Doctor's name when bluffing to the Cybermen about being the Doctor. (TV: Death in Heaven [+]Loading...["Death in Heaven (TV story)"]) Additionally, she was able to hear and see River when she said the Doctor's name to open his tomb, but the circumstances of River's saying of the Doctor's name are unknown. (TV: The Name of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Name of the Doctor (TV story)"])

Missy claimed to know the Doctor's real name from their time together on Gallifrey. She said it was "Doctor Who", and the Doctor had chosen it to be mysterious, but dropped the "Who" when he realised it was "too on-the-nose". The Twelfth Doctor said she was just teasing Bill Potts, but he refused to answer if it was truly his name. (TV: World Enough and Time [+]Loading...["World Enough and Time (TV story)"])

"Doctor Who"[[edit]]

The First Doctor, when asked who he is, responds that he is Who. (COMIC: Challenge of the Piper [+]Loading...["Challenge of the Piper (comic story)"])

The name "Doctor Who" was used by or applied to the Doctor on a large number of occasions, with accounts varying on whether this seemed to be the time-traveller's actual name — or at any rate a name they accepted and used for themselves — or simply a placeholder applied to them by others for lack of knowledge of his real names.

The Third Doctor once stated that his real name was not "Doctor Who", but that others often called him that for lack of him divulging his actual true name. (TV: The Shrink [+]Loading...["The Shrink (TV story)"])

The Master addressed a postcard to the Third Doctor as "Dr Who". (COMIC: Fogbound [+]Loading...["Fogbound (comic story)"]) Missy later made two bold claims to Bill Potts in quick succession, first that "Doctor Who" was in fact the Doctor's real name, and second that it was, more specifically, an alias he had chosen himself early on, as an attempt to "sound mysterious". In this account, he would later drop the "Who" because it was "a tiny bit on-the-nose". The Twelfth Doctor told Bill she was just trying to wind her up, but he later identified himself as "Doctor Who" to Jorj, noting that he liked the name. (TV: World Enough and Time [+]Loading...["World Enough and Time (TV story)"]) According to one account, a conversation he had with Missy at an earlier point bore out Missy's claim, seeing him explain to her that the name arose from the question of "who to save", calling it "the Doctor's Who". (COMIC: The Road To... [+]Loading...["The Road To... (comic story)"])

When the First Doctor was using the name "Doctor Caligari" and someone remarked, "Doctor who?" he replied, "Yes, quite right."; (TV: The Gunfighters [+]Loading...["The Gunfighters (TV story)"]) similarly, when Jimmy Forbes asked "Doctor who?", another incarnation of the Doctor replied "Yes, if you like.", (AUDIO: Seven Keys to Doomsday [+]Loading...["Seven Keys to Doomsday (audio story)"]) and when Citizen 327KL asked "Doctor who?", the Fourth Doctor simply said "yes". (TV: Dr. Who For Keep Australia Beautiful [+]Loading...["Dr. Who For Keep Australia Beautiful (TV story)"]) When a time-shifted Susan Foreman was confronted with the Sixth Doctor without recognising him, and asked "Who are you?", he replied "Precisely! I am the Doctor". (TV: Dimensions in Time [+]Loading...["Dimensions in Time (TV story)"]) The Fourth Doctor outright stated that his name was "Dr Who" when Richard the Lionheart asked for his name; King Richard later referred to him as simply "Who". (PROSE: Doctor Who Discovers The Conquerors [+]Loading...["Doctor Who Discovers The Conquerors (novel)"])

The TARDIS-Keeper on Gallifrey also knew the Doctor as "Who". (PROSE: Doctor Who and the Doomsday Weapon [+]Loading...["Doctor Who and the Doomsday Weapon (novelisation)"])

The computer WOTAN repeatedly referred to the First Doctor as "Doctor Who". (TV: The War Machines [+]Loading...["The War Machines (TV story)"]) Both Ian Chesterton and Vicki occasionally called the Doctor "Doctor Who", (PROSE: Doctor Who and the Zarbi [+]Loading...["Doctor Who and the Zarbi (novelisation)"]) as did Argon, (PROSE: Terror on Tiro [+]Loading...["Terror on Tiro (short story)"]) Mitzog, (PROSE: The Cloud Exiles [+]Loading...["The Cloud Exiles (short story)"]) and Phlege. (COMIC: Mission for Duh [+]Loading...["Mission for Duh (comic story)"]) The Doctor's grandson John (COMIC: The Klepton Parasites [+]Loading...["The Klepton Parasites (comic story)"]) used the last name "Who". (PROSE: Beware the Trods! [+]Loading...["Beware the Trods! (short story)"])

The First Doctor used the username "Dr_who" when bidding on the TARDIS, which he lost to Buchanan in a bet, on RetroAuction.com in 2006. (PROSE: The Mother Road [+]Loading...["The Mother Road (short story)"])

The Second Doctor briefly used the name "Doktor von Wer" (literally, "Doctor [of] Who") during his visit to Scotland on 16 April 1746, (TV: The Highlanders [+]Loading...["The Highlanders (TV story)"]) and he once signed a message as "Dr W." (TV: The Underwater Menace [+]Loading...["The Underwater Menace (TV story)"]) The Zaons called him "Doctor Who". (PROSE: Daleks Invade Zaos [+]Loading...["Daleks Invade Zaos (short story)"]) Bessie's license plate during the Third Doctor's time at UNIT read WHO 1; (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Loading...["Doctor Who and the Silurians (TV story)"]) in the Doctor's seventh incarnation it read WHO 7, (TV: Battlefield [+]Loading...["Battlefield (TV story)"]) and WHO 8 in his eighth incarnation. (PROSE: The Dying Days [+]Loading...["The Dying Days (novel)"]) Miss Hawthorne referred to the Third Doctor as "the great wizard Qui Quae Quod"; those three words all mean "who" in Latin. (TV: The Dæmons [+]Loading...["The Dæmons (TV story)"]) The aged Keeper of the Files referred to the Doctor with the name "Who". (PROSE: Doctor Who and the Doomsday Weapon [+]Loading...["Doctor Who and the Doomsday Weapon (novelisation)"]) The Curator referred to his nose as a "Who nose", (TV: The Day of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Day of the Doctor (TV story)"]) and after discovering his formative role in Davros's early life, the Twelfth Doctor remarked that "Who made Davros." (TV: The Magician's Apprentice [+]Loading...["The Magician's Apprentice (TV story)"]) The Fourth Doctor wrote a series of children's books during his time with UNIT which were mistakenly published under the name "Doctor Who": they were intended to be "The Doctor, Who Discovers Historical Mysteries", but the publishers, due to a miscommunication, presented it as "Doctor Who Discovers Historical Mysteries". (AUDIO: The Kingmaker [+]Loading...["The Kingmaker (audio story)"]) A version of the Doctor in a young boy's imagination, based off a fictional depiction of the Doctor off television, claimed that she was "not allowed" to refer to herself as "Doctor Who", despite personally finding it "brilliant". (PROSE: The Terror of the Umpty Ums [+]Loading...["The Terror of the Umpty Ums (short story)"]) K9 occasionally made playful remarks related to the "Who" name. (TV: A Girl's Best Friend [+]Loading...["A Girl's Best Friend (TV story)"], Invasion of the Bane [+]Loading...["Invasion of the Bane (TV story)"]) Clive Finch's website called him "Doctor Who". (TV: Rose [+]Loading...["Rose (TV story)"]) Upon reading the Tenth Doctor's mind, Reinette remarked that "Doctor Who" was "more than just a secret". (TV: The Girl in the Fireplace [+]Loading...["The Girl in the Fireplace (TV story)"]) The oldest question in the universe was "Doctor Who?" (TV: The Wedding of River Song [+]Loading...["The Wedding of River Song (TV story)"]) The version of the Doctor in the Land of Fiction was known as Dr. Who. (PROSE: Prelude Conundrum [+]Loading...["Prelude Conundrum (short story)"], Conundrum [+]Loading...["Conundrum (novel)"], Head Games [+]Loading...["Head Games (novel)"]) On television in the 1960s, fans referred to him as Dr. Who. (COMIC: TV Terrors [+]Loading...["TV Terrors (TVC 709 comic story)"])

Theta Sigma[[edit]]

The Doctor's old Academy schoolmate Drax knew the Doctor as "Theta Sigma", which he informally shortened to "Thete". The Fourth Doctor repeatedly corrected him when they met again centuries later, wanting to be called Doctor instead. (TV: The Armageddon Factor [+]Loading...["The Armageddon Factor (TV story)"])

Some accounts treated "Theta Sigma" as the Doctor's actual, proper name as far as Gallifrey was concerned; for example, some Gallifreyan records noted that K9 Mark I had formerly been a companion to "the Time Lord Theta Sigma". (PROSE: K9 and the Beasts of Vega [+]Loading...["K9 and the Beasts of Vega (novel)"], etc.) In an alternate timeline in which Rassilon failed to finish the Eye of Harmony before his death, the Doctor never left Gallifrey and became a commentator rather than a renegade Time Lord. He was known as Commentator Theta Sigma. (AUDIO: Forever [+]Loading...["Forever (audio story)"])

"ΘΣ" was part of River Song's message to the Eleventh Doctor on the universe's oldest cliff-face. (TV: The Pandorica Opens [+]Loading...["The Pandorica Opens (TV story)"]) River Song claimed and demonstrated on numerous occasions that she knew the Doctor's secret real name. (TV: Forest of the Dead [+]Loading...["Forest of the Dead (TV story)"], The Name of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Name of the Doctor (TV story)"], etc.)

However, the Seventh Doctor would later claim that "Theta Sigma" was his "nickname at college" to the coincidentally-named Trevor Sigma. (TV: The Happiness Patrol [+]Loading...["The Happiness Patrol (TV story)"]) The Ninth Doctor would later reiterate this in a duel with the Grimminy-Grew to guess the other's true name, saying that "old school nicknames don't count". (AUDIO: Station to Station [+]Loading...["Station to Station (audio story)"])

In one account, the Doctor considered it a "Time Lord coding", which he couldn't "bear [to be] addressed as". (PROSE: Doctor Who and the Armageddon Factor [+]Loading...["Doctor Who and the Armageddon Factor (novelisation)"]) It identified him uniquely amongst the Time Lords and was not to be spoken outside of the Academy. (PROSE: {{cs|Falls the Shadow (novel)}|}) According to the author of The Time Lord Letters, a historical document compiling writings by and concerning the Doctor, "Theta Sigma" was also their Academy Student Identification Code. (PROSE The Time Lord Letters [+]Loading...["The Time Lord Letters (novel)"])

When the Doctor's final incarnation permanently died during the first battle of the War in Heaven, his coffin had two Greek letters on it; one of these was "Sigma". (PROSE: Alien Bodies [+]Loading...["Alien Bodies (novel)"])

Commonly used aliases[[edit]]

John Smith[[edit]]

John Smith was an alias the Doctor frequently used on Earth and around humans when a "standard" name was needed, with the Eighth Doctor noting it was "the nom de guerre [he] seem[ed] to keep ending up with". (PROSE: Alien Bodies [+]Loading...["Alien Bodies (novel)"]) It was often preceded by the title "Doctor", though not always — for example, when he was undercover as a teacher at a school or a patient in a hospital. (TV: School Reunion [+]Loading...["School Reunion (TV story)"], Smith and Jones [+]Loading...["Smith and Jones (TV story)"]) As "John Smith" was considered a generic name in some Earth cultures, the Doctor's use of the alias was occasionally treated with scepticism. (TV: Midnight [+]Loading...["Midnight (TV story)"])

The First Doctor used a library card with the name Dr J. Smith while living at 76 Totter's Lane, (TV: The Vampires of Venice [+]Loading...["The Vampires of Venice (TV story)"]) as well as for identification when renting the junkyard. (PROSE: The Rag & Bone Man's Story [+]Loading...["The Rag & Bone Man's Story (short story)"]) The inspiration for the alias was John Smith of John Smith and the Common Men, with which he was familiar through Susan. (PROSE: The Witch Hunters [+]Loading...["The Witch Hunters (novel)"])

In their second incarnation, the name was independently used by his companion Jamie McCrimmon while the Doctor was being treated for a concussion, as he saw it being used as a brand name on a metal container. (TV: The Wheel in Space [+]Loading...["The Wheel in Space (TV story)"]) The Doctor himself used the alias when being interrogated by a German soldier. (TV: The War Games [+]Loading...["The War Games (TV story)"]) Likewise, Chang Lee chose to register the name for the Seventh Doctor while he was en route to get his bullet wounds healed. (TV: Doctor Who [+]Loading...["Doctor Who (TV story)"])

The Doctor adopted the name on a semi-regular basis during their third incarnation while exiled on Earth, when he served as unpaid scientific advisor to UNIT. (TV: Spearhead from Space [+]Loading...["Spearhead from Space (TV story)"], Inferno [+]Loading...["Inferno (TV story)"], The Time Warrior [+]Loading...["The Time Warrior (TV story)"]) The UNIT files referred to him as "Dr. J.S.". (AUDIO: Tales from the Vault [+]Loading...["Tales from the Vault (audio story)"])

The Doctor twice changed himself into a human who used the name John Smith. This occurred in their seventh incarnation, (PROSE: Human Nature [+]Loading...["Human Nature (novel)"]) and in their tenth incarnation. (TV: Human Nature [+]Loading...["Human Nature (TV story)"])

Often, the Doctor would use variations of the name, like the online handle "jsmith", jsmith8", (PROSE: Blue Box [+]Loading...["Blue Box (novel)"], Lonely [+]Loading...["Lonely (short story)"]) the French variation "Jean Forgeron", (COMIC: The Forgotten [+]Loading...["The Forgotten (comic story)"]) or the German translation "Johann Schmidt". (PROSE: The Shadow in the Glass [+]Loading...["The Shadow in the Glass (novel)"]; AUDIO: Storm Warning [+]Loading...["Storm Warning (audio story)"])

The Thirteenth Doctor once made use of a variant, "Jane Smith", while hiding her true identity from Martha Jones. (COMIC: A Little Help from My Friends [+]Loading...["A Little Help from My Friends (comic story)"])

By one account, "John Smith" was the name which the Meta-Crisis Tenth Doctor chose to go upon settling down with Rose Tyler. (COMIC: Empire of the Wolf [+]Loading...["Empire of the Wolf (comic story)"])

The Tenth Doctor attempted to use this alias when he met the Fourth Doctor. However, he opted out of the second half and instead used Rose's last name, ending up with "John Tyler" instead. (AUDIO: Out of Time [+]Loading...["Out of Time (audio story)"])

The Oncoming Storm[[edit]]

The Doctor was referred to as "the Oncoming Storm" by the Draconians, (PROSE: Love and War [+]Loading...["Love and War (novel)"]) himself (PROSE: Vampire Science [+]Loading...["Vampire Science (novel)"]) and in "the ancient legends of the Dalek homeworld". (TV: The Parting of the Ways [+]Loading...["The Parting of the Ways (TV story)"]) In Draconian, the title was pronounced "Karshtakavaar". (PROSE: Love and War [+]Loading...["Love and War (novel)"]) After being told of the title by the Ninth Doctor, (TV: The Parting of the Ways [+]Loading...["The Parting of the Ways (TV story)"]) Rose Tyler called the Tenth Doctor by the "Oncoming Storm" when she and Mickey Smith were being prepared for dissection by the Clockwork Droids. (TV: The Girl in the Fireplace [+]Loading...["The Girl in the Fireplace (TV story)"])

The Tenth Doctor later introduced himself as the "Oncoming Storm" to a Dalek aboard of the Wayfarer, (PROSE: Prisoner of the Daleks [+]Loading...["Prisoner of the Daleks (novel)"]) and referred to the title when confronting a rabbit he thought was a Zygon. (TV: The Day of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Day of the Doctor (TV story)"])

The Eleventh Doctor began calling himself the "Oncoming Storm" when he misinterpreted Sean's request to help the King's Arms football team "annihilate" another team at a match. (TV: The Lodger [+]Loading...["The Lodger (TV story)"]) He later referred to the title when the Daleks forgot him. (TV: Asylum of the Daleks [+]Loading...["Asylum of the Daleks (TV story)"])

Destroyer of Worlds[[edit]]

As early as their second incarnation, the Doctor knew that the Daleks had also given them the epithet "Ka Faraq Gatri", (COMIC: Bringer of Darkness [+]Loading...["Bringer of Darkness (comic story)"]) which translated as "Destroyer of Worlds". (PROSE: Timewyrm: Revelation [+]Loading...["Timewyrm: Revelation (novel)"]) or possibly, "Nice guy, if you're a biped". (PROSE: Continuity Errors [+]Loading...["Continuity Errors (short story)"]) He had been awarded the name upon orchestrating the destruction of the Dalek home planet Skaro in his seventh incarnation, (TV: Remembrance of the Daleks [+]Loading...["Remembrance of the Daleks (TV story)"]) though the Daleks also used it prior to Skaro's destruction. (COMIC: Bringer of Darkness [+]Loading...["Bringer of Darkness (comic story)"]) Davros also referred to the Doctor as "the Destroyer of Worlds" after the Meta-Crisis Tenth Doctor destroyed the New Dalek Empire on the Crucible. (TV: Journey's End [+]Loading...["Journey's End (TV story)"])

First Doctor[[edit]]

Known uses of John Smith[[edit]]

Other aliases[[edit]]

Impersonations[[edit]]

Nicknames[[edit]]

Titles and epitaphs[[edit]]

Second Doctor[[edit]]

Known uses of John Smith[[edit]]

Other aliases[[edit]]

  • Gaius Iunius Faber: "Iunius Faber" being the Latin equivalent of John Smith. The Second Doctor used this alias during his visit to Bruttium, Italy in 71 BC. (PROSE: The Slave War [+]Loading...["The Slave War (short story)"])
  • Doctor Galloway: Edward Waterfield made up this name for the Second Doctor when arranging to meet him. (TV: The Evil of the Daleks [+]Loading...["The Evil of the Daleks (TV story)"])
  • The Wizard of Omega (COMIC: The Witches [+]Loading...["The Witches (comic story)"])
  • Dr Rip Van Winkle: A name given to him by Mrs Craig. (PROSE: The Indestructible Man [+]Loading...["The Indestructible Man (novel)"])
  • Doctor Gond (TV: The Krotons [+]Loading...["The Krotons (TV story)"])
  • Citizen-Representative Henri Dupont (PROSE: World Game [+]Loading...["World Game (novel)"])
  • Doctor Jean Dupont (PROSE: World Game [+]Loading...["World Game (novel)"])
  • Doctor Mason: An alias used when he took part in a jury at the trial of the First Doctor for killing a werewolf. (PROSE: The Juror's Story [+]Loading...["The Juror's Story (short story)"])

Impersonations[[edit]]

Nicknames[[edit]]

  • Clown: A nickname bestowed upon him by the First Doctor for his comical dress sense. (TV: The Three Doctors [+]Loading...["The Three Doctors (TV story)"])
  • Beatles Haircut: A nickname given to the Second Doctor by Ace. (AUDIO: The Light at the End [+]Loading...["The Light at the End (audio story)"])
  • Archibald (PROSE: Fallen Angel [+]Loading...["Fallen Angel (short story)"])
  • Alphonse (PROSE: Fallen Angel [+]Loading...["Fallen Angel (short story)"])
  • High-Brain (TV: The Krotons [+]Loading...["The Krotons (TV story)"])
  • Scarecrow: Spitefully used as a retort against his unkempt appearance by the Third Doctor in return for being called "fancy pants". (TV: The Five Doctors [+]Loading...["The Five Doctors (TV story)"])

Titles and epitaphs[[edit]]

Third Doctor[[edit]]

Known uses of John Smith[[edit]]

Other aliases[[edit]]

Impersonations[[edit]]

Nicknames[[edit]]

  • Dr. Watson: Called as such by the Brigadier in retaliation to the Doctor belittling his intelligence by saying he was "not exactly a little Sherlock Holmes". (TV: Doctor Who and the Silurians [+]Loading...["Doctor Who and the Silurians (TV story)"])
  • Monsieur Mystery (COMIC: Timebenders [+]Loading...["Timebenders (comic story)"])
  • Dandy: A nickname bestowed upon him by the First Doctor for his upper-class attire. (TV: The Three Doctors [+]Loading...["The Three Doctors (TV story)"])
  • Thedoct>Orism: The Doctor's title as interpreted by the Siccati. It could be shortened to Thedoct. (PROSE: Neptune [+]Loading...["Neptune (short story)"], Sedna [+]Loading...["Sedna (short story)"])
  • Frilly Shirt: A nickname given to the Third Doctor by Ace. (AUDIO: The Light at the End [+]Loading...["The Light at the End (audio story)"])
  • The Spokesperson (TV: Death to the Daleks [+]Loading...["Death to the Daleks (TV story)"])
  • White Thing (COMIC: After the Revolution [+]Loading...["After the Revolution (comic story)"])
  • Fancy Pants: An insult used by the Second Doctor to get a parting shot in at his successor's appearance before the incarnations went their separate ways. (TV: The Five Doctors [+]Loading...["The Five Doctors (TV story)"])

Titles and epitaphs[[edit]]

Fourth Doctor[[edit]]

Known uses of John Smith[[edit]]

  • A French variation, "Brigadier-General Jean Forgeron," was used by the Doctor when met by French soldiers in the labyrinth underneath Paris. (COMIC: The Forgotten [+]Loading...["The Forgotten (comic story)"])
  • He used the name in Budapest in 1980. (AUDIO: The Labyrinth of Buda Castle [+]Loading...["The Labyrinth of Buda Castle (audio story)"])
  • Figment knew the Fourth Doctor by the name "Jonathan Smith". (POEM: Afterwords [+]Loading...["Afterwords (poem)"])

Other aliases[[edit]]

Impersonations[[edit]]

Nicknames[[edit]]

Titles and epitaphs[[edit]]

  • The Bohemian / The Wanderer: Titles given to the Fourth Doctor by the Master. (GAME: Destiny of the Doctors [+]Loading...["Destiny of the Doctors (video game)"])
  • The Evil One: The Sevateem tribe referred to the Doctor as "the Evil One". Xoanon, the supercomputer which they worshipped, had two personalities, one of which was based on the Fourth Doctor. (TV: The Face of Evil [+]Loading...["The Face of Evil (TV story)"])
  • The Wizard: Emily, a child in whom Leela was reborn after her death, referred to the Doctor as "the Wizard." (AUDIO: The Child [+]Loading...["The Child (audio story)"])
  • The Boggle-Eyed Demon: Delthea's people believed the Doctor was a malevolant being from their history who had brought their civilisation to ruin by destroying the Protector. He was remembered as the Boggle-Eyed Demon is their pantomimes and other stories which villified him. (PROSE: The Destroyers [+]Loading...["The Destroyers (short story)"])
  • Everywhere Man: The Tarl leader Ergu opted to refer to the Doctor as this was after asking him about his origins. The Doctor answered he came from "everywhere". (AUDIO: The Exxilons [+]Loading...["The Exxilons (audio story)"])
  • The Great Emoter (COMIC: City of the Damned [+]Loading...["City of the Damned (comic story)"])

Fifth Doctor[[edit]]

Known uses of John Smith[[edit]]

Other aliases[[edit]]

  • Gaius Claudius Maximus: The Doctor used this name while visiting Cumae in 63 BC. (AUDIO: Tartarus [+]Loading...["Tartarus (audio story)"])
  • Doctor Walters: The Doctor used this name while stuck in Victorian London without his TARDIS for a year from November 1866 to 1867. (AUDIO: The Haunting of Thomas Brewster [+]Loading...["The Haunting of Thomas Brewster (audio story)"])
  • Dr Jonas Smythe: The Doctor used this name when working with Liz Shaw in Italy. (PROSE: Flashpoint [+]Loading...["Flashpoint (short story)"])
  • The Supremo: The Doctor called himself "the Supremo" while leading the Alliance against the army of the renegade Time Lord Morbius. Originally, his title was "Supreme Controller", but the Ogrons of his personal guard could not pronounce it and shortened it to the simpler "Supremo". (PROSE: Warmonger [+]Loading...["Warmonger (novel)"])

Impersonations[[edit]]

Nicknames[[edit]]

Sixth Doctor[[edit]]

Known uses of John Smith[[edit]]

Other aliases[[edit]]

Impersonations[[edit]]

Nicknames[[edit]]

Titles and epitaphs[[edit]]

Seventh Doctor[[edit]]

Known uses of John Smith[[edit]]

Other aliases[[edit]]

Impersonations[[edit]]

Nicknames[[edit]]

  • Sunbeam (TV: Paradise Towers [+]Loading...["Paradise Towers (TV story)"])
  • Professor: Ace called the Doctor this instead of his preferred name. (TV: Dragonfire [+]Loading...["Dragonfire (TV story)"] et al.)

Titles and epitaphs[[edit]]

Eighth Doctor[[edit]]

Known uses of John Smith[[edit]]

Other aliases[[edit]]

  • John Doe: In a continuation of the circumstances described above for the Seventh Doctor, the Eighth Doctor was referred to by this name after his escape from the morgue was discovered. (TV: Doctor Who [+]Loading...["Doctor Who (TV story)"])
  • Dr. James Alistair Bowman: Dr Grace Holloway came up with the name "Dr. Bowman" for the Eighth Doctor whilst introducing him to others at the New Year's Eve party. (TV: Doctor Who [+]Loading...["Doctor Who (TV story)"]) The Doctor subsequently used the "Dr. Bowman" alias on occasion, filling it out to "James Alistair Bowman", (PROSE: Seeing I [+]Loading...["Seeing I (novel)"], Unnatural History [+]Loading...["Unnatural History (novel)"], Frontier Worlds [+]Loading...["Frontier Worlds (novel)"]) such as when at the First Doctor's trial for the killing of a werewolf. (PROSE: The Juror's Story [+]Loading...["The Juror's Story (short story)"])
  • Dr. Beech: According to one account, Grace came up with the name "Dr. Beech" for the Doctor whilst introducing him to others at the New Year's Eve party. (PROSE: The Novel of the Film [+]Loading...["The Novel of the Film (novelisation)"])
  • Merlin: The Doctor took up the alias to deliver King Arthur in another reality. (PROSE: One Fateful Knight [+]Loading...["One Fateful Knight (short story)"]) Later, whilst stuck in the otherworld of Avalon, the Doctor attempted to pass himself off as Merlin to Queen Mab. (PROSE: The Shadows of Avalon [+]Loading...["The Shadows of Avalon (novel)"])
  • Doctor Doctor: Inadvertently introduced as such when talking to Doctor Charles Roley and his staff; Sam Jones dismissed it as an amusing irony, with the Doctor explaining that this was why he preferred to just be known as "Doctor". (PROSE: The Taint [+]Loading...["The Taint (novel)"])
  • Dr Jack-of-the-Moon: This was a term meaning those who concentrated on high-minded things at the expense of the normal world. It was used to refer to the Doctor (for example, on his marriage invitation) during his time on Henrietta Street. (PROSE: The Adventuress of Henrietta Street [+]Loading...["The Adventuress of Henrietta Street (novel)"])
  • Perdix: While in Rhadamanthys' court. (PROSE: Fallen Gods [+]Loading...["Fallen Gods (novel)"])
  • Blessed Destroyer: Erasmus told Chloe that their world had been destroyed by the Blessed Destroyer. (PROSE: Timeless [+]Loading...["Timeless (novel)"])
  • Gracie Witherspoon: To defeat the Threshold, the Doctor used a personal chameleon circuit to take the appearance of a female Threshold agent while Shayde masqueraded as the Doctor. (COMIC: Wormwood [+]Loading...["Wormwood (comic story)"])
  • Dr Frankenstein: When meeting Mary Shelley and the other inhabitants of Villa Diodati in Switzerland, the half-delirious Doctor introduced himself this way. (AUDIO: Mary's Story [+]Loading...["Mary's Story (audio story)"])
  • Ambrosius Clemenses: An alias used in 305, with Charley being "Dasia Dasia". (AUDIO: Seasons of Fear [+]Loading...["Seasons of Fear (audio story)"])
  • Reverend Doctor of Bruges: An alias used in 1055, with Charley being "Lady Charlotte". (AUDIO: Seasons of Fear [+]Loading...["Seasons of Fear (audio story)"])
  • Sir Doctor Peter Pollard: When he arrived at Sebastian Grayle's 19th-century manor house, with Charlotte Pollard pretending to be his daughter. (AUDIO: Seasons of Fear [+]Loading...["Seasons of Fear (audio story)"])
  • Bert Higgins: While on Nixyce VII. (AUDIO: The Traitor [+]Loading...["The Traitor (audio story)"], Eyes of the Master [+]Loading...["Eyes of the Master (audio story)"])
  • Dr Foster: To hide his identity from Nyssa, he introduced himself as Dr Foster from the planet Gloucester, famous for its rains and huge puddles. (AUDIO: A Heart on Both Sides [+]Loading...["A Heart on Both Sides (audio story)"])
  • Captain Jonah: While serving as captain on the Bloodhound during the Time War. (AUDIO: Jonah [+]Loading...["Jonah (audio story)"])
  • Mr Seta (AUDIO: The Edge of Redemption [+]Loading...["The Edge of Redemption (audio story)"])

Impersonations[[edit]]

Nicknames[[edit]]

  • Skipper: The Doctor's companion Samson Griffin always referred to him as such. (AUDIO: Terror Firma [+]Loading...["Terror Firma (audio story)"])
  • Lord Byron: A nickname given to the Eighth Doctor by Ace. (AUDIO: The Light at the End [+]Loading...["The Light at the End (audio story)"])
  • Tigger / Eeyore: When the Doctor is split into three, each bearing different parts of his personality, Charley Pollard gave these nicknames to the bouncy and excitable, and the surly and ruthless Doctors. (AUDIO: Caerdroia [+]Loading...["Caerdroia (audio story)"])
  • Specific Healer (PROSE: Osskah [+]Loading...["Osskah (short story)"])

Titles and epitaphs[[edit]]

War Doctor[[edit]]

Known uses of John Smith[[edit]]

  • The War Doctor used the name John Smith to introduce himself to Garv on Keska. (AUDIO: The Thousand Worlds [+]Loading...["The Thousand Worlds (audio story)"])
  • He also used the name when introducing himself to Coyne, as he did not wish for his Time Lord heritage to be discovered. (PROSE: Engines of War [+]Loading...["Engines of War (novel)"])

Other aliases[[edit]]

  • Prisoner 101: A designation given to him by Cardinal Ollistra when she arrested him as a war criminal. (AUDIO: Legion of the Lost [+]Loading...["Legion of the Lost (audio story)"])
  • Stowaway: Rosata Laxter called him this repeatedly after discovering the Doctor on her ship, when she heard others refer to him by his former title, he insisted she continued calling him "Stowaway". (AUDIO: The Lady of Obsidian [+]Loading...["The Lady of Obsidian (audio story)"])

Nicknames[[edit]]

  • Greybeard: A descriptive name given to him by Kalan during the rescuing operation on Rovidia. (AUDIO: The Eternity Cage [+]Loading...["The Eternity Cage (audio story)"])
  • The Mad Fool: A nickname given by the Eleventh General, since the War Doctor was working against the Time Lords' plans and seemingly ensuring their destruction. (TV: The Day of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Day of the Doctor (TV story)"])
  • Grandad: A nickname given by the Eleventh Doctor due to the War Doctor's aged appearance. (TV: The Day of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Day of the Doctor (TV story)"])
  • Captain Grumpy: A nickname given by the Eleventh Doctor due to the War Doctor's serious personality. (TV: The Time of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Time of the Doctor (TV story)"])

Titles and epitaphs[[edit]]

  • The Warrior: The moniker the Doctor chose to take in the Fifth Segment of the Time War upon his eighth regeneration, (PROSE: The Stranger [+]Loading...["The Stranger (short story)"]) and his rejection of his "Doctor" title. (TV: The Night of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Night of the Doctor (TV story)"]) By the time he went back to the First Segment of the war, he had stopped calling himself a warrior as well. (PROSE: The Stranger [+]Loading...["The Stranger (short story)"]) Clara Oswald later referred to him as "the Warrior" to differ himself from the Tenth and Eleventh Doctors. (TV: The Day of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Day of the Doctor (TV story)"])
  • The Lord of Death: One of the Volatix Cabal identified the Doctor as such during the Time War. (COMIC: The Organ Grinder [+]Loading...["The Organ Grinder (comic story)"])
  • The Predator of the Daleks: A descriptive term for the Doctor used by the Daleks, (TV: Asylum of the Daleks [+]Loading...["Asylum of the Daleks (TV story)"]) that originated during his war incarnation. (PROSE: Engines of War [+]Loading...["Engines of War (novel)"], Decoy [+]Loading...["Decoy (short story)"])
  • The Deathbringer: A title bestowed upon the Doctor by the Daleks during the Time War. (PROSE: Decoy [+]Loading...["Decoy (short story)"])
  • The One Without Mercy: A title bestowed upon the Doctor by the Daleks during the Time War. (PROSE: Decoy [+]Loading...["Decoy (short story)"])
  • Dalek Killer: One of the names awarded to the War Doctor by the Daleks. (PROSE: Engines of War [+]Loading...["Engines of War (novel)"])
  • The Great Scourge: One of the names awarded to the War Doctor by the Daleks. (PROSE: Engines of War [+]Loading...["Engines of War (novel)"])
  • The Living Death: One of the names awarded to the War Doctor by the Daleks. (PROSE: Engines of War [+]Loading...["Engines of War (novel)"])
  • The Executioner: One of the names awarded to the War Doctor by the Daleks. (PROSE: Engines of War [+]Loading...["Engines of War (novel)"])
  • The Renegade: A name the Time Lords used to refer to the War Doctor as he planned to use the Moment to end the Last Great Time War. (COMIC: Sky Jacks [+]Loading...["Sky Jacks (comic story)"])
  • The Doctor of War: A name that arose as part of a saying used to describe him during the Time War that was recorded by the Testimony and used by Gastron. (TV: Hell Bent [+]Loading...["Hell Bent (TV story)"], Twice Upon a Time [+]Loading...["Twice Upon a Time (TV story)"])
  • The Butcher of Skull Moon: Among the names for the Doctor recorded by the Testimony, (TV: Twice Upon a Time [+]Loading...["Twice Upon a Time (TV story)"]) in reference a battlefield attended by the War Doctor during the Last Great Time War. (TV: Hell Bent [+]Loading...["Hell Bent (TV story)"])

Ninth Doctor[[edit]]

Known uses of John Smith[[edit]]

  • The name Doctor as "Dr John Smith" on a piece of psychic paper during the Ninth Doctor's visit to 1941. (TV: The Empty Child [+]Loading...["The Empty Child (TV story)"])
  • While imprisoned at Hesguard Institute, the Doctor wore a jumpsuit identifying him as "J. Smith". (COMIC: Sin-Eaters [+]Loading...["Sin-Eaters (comic story)"])

Other aliases[[edit]]

Nicknames[[edit]]

  • The Navvie: Honoré Lechasseur's nickname for the Doctor, due to his leather jacket. (PROSE: The Albino's Dancer [+]Loading...["The Albino's Dancer (novel)"])
  • U-boat Captain: A snide nickname given by Captain Jack, who mocked the Ninth Doctor's double-breasted peacoat of black leather which made him look like a Nazi officer. (TV: The Empty Child [+]Loading...["The Empty Child (TV story)"])
  • Larry: Called this by Jackie Tyler after being ordered to close the TARDIS doors. (COMIC: Supremacy of the Cybermen [+]Loading...["Supremacy of the Cybermen (comic story)"])
  • Muggins: Jackie Tyler uses this name to refer to the Doctor after the TARDIS central console exploded. (COMIC: Supremacy of the Cybermen [+]Loading...["Supremacy of the Cybermen (comic story)"])
  • Big Ears: Mickey Smith describes the Ninth Doctor in this way, causing the latter to believe Mickey was saying he wasn't handsome. (TV: Boom Town [+]Loading...["Boom Town (TV story)"])
  • Me with the ears: The Tenth Doctor called him this to address him directly. (COMIC: The Lost Dimension [+]Loading...["The Lost Dimension (comic story)"])
  • Marley's Ghost: In reference to Jacob Marley of A Christmas Carol, his Matrix projection is called this by the Tenth Doctor when he makes a comment about the latter's changing after the Time War. (COMIC: The Forgotten [+]Loading...["The Forgotten (comic story)"])
  • Big Nose: The Tenth Doctor refers to this incarnation as such when questioning the Alternate Twelfth Doctor about his whereabouts. (COMIC: Four Doctors [+]Loading...["Four Doctors (comic story)"])
  • God of Outer Mystery: Called as such by Mickey Smith on the Who is Doctor Who? website. (PROSE: Hoax This! [+]Loading...["Hoax This! (short story)"])

Titles and epitaphs[[edit]]

  • The Final Judgement: Title used by Addison Delamar when auctioning off the Doctor's memories. (COMIC: The Bidding War [+]Loading...["The Bidding War (comic story)"])
  • The Prophet: Called so by Father Heretika, a representative of the Church of the Evergreen Man, a race who believed the Doctor to be a messiah. (COMIC: The Bidding War [+]Loading...["The Bidding War (comic story)"])
  • The Coward: The name given by the Metaltron Dalek. (TV: Dalek [+]Loading...["Dalek (TV story)"])
  • The Great Exterminator: The name given to the Doctor by the Dalek Emperor whilst preparing a Delta Wave. (TV: The Parting of the Ways [+]Loading...["The Parting of the Ways (TV story)"])
  • The Great Destroyer: Another name given to the Doctor by the Dalek Emperor, whilst taunting the Doctor to use his Delta Wave. (TV: The Parting of the Ways [+]Loading...["The Parting of the Ways (TV story)"])
  • The Heathen: Another name given to the Doctor by the Dalek Emperor. (TV: The Parting of the Ways [+]Loading...["The Parting of the Ways (TV story)"])

Tenth Doctor[[edit]]

Known uses of John Smith[[edit]]

  • The Tenth Doctor used the name while working undercover as a science teacher at Deffry Vale High School. (TV: School Reunion [+]Loading...["School Reunion (TV story)"])
  • He also used it while posing as a patient at Royal Hope Hospital (TV: Smith and Jones [+]Loading...["Smith and Jones (TV story)"])
  • While temporarily human in 20th Century England, he used the name John Smith, believing it to be his actual name. (TV: Human Nature [+]Loading...["Human Nature (TV story)"] / The Family of Blood [+]Loading...["The Family of Blood (TV story)"])
  • He used the name "Dr. John Smith, opto-mechanical technician for the Imperial College [of] London" to gain access to the Griffith Observatory. (COMIC: Quiet on the Set [+]Loading...["Quiet on the Set (comic story)"])
  • The Tenth Doctor told Professor Conrad Morris that his name was John Smith in 2088. (PROSE: Breathing Space [+]Loading...["Breathing Space (short story)"])
  • The Tenth Doctor used the name while impersonating a health and safety officer during an investigation of Adipose Industries. (TV: Partners in Crime [+]Loading...["Partners in Crime (TV story)"])
  • While at Eddison Manor after the murder of Professor Gerald Peach, the Tenth Doctor claimed to be Chief Inspector Smith of Scotland Yard in order to keep the police out of what he suspected to be an alien crime. (TV: The Unicorn and the Wasp [+]Loading...["The Unicorn and the Wasp (TV story)"])
  • The Tenth Doctor attempted to use the alias aboard the Crusader 50 bus on the planet Midnight when asked for his name, but it was recognised as a false name and rejected by the panicking humans aboard. (TV: Midnight [+]Loading...["Midnight (TV story)"])
  • He used it when reintroducing himself to Donna Noble after he erased her memories of him. (TV: Journey's End [+]Loading...["Journey's End (TV story)"])
  • He used it when encountering Jackson Lake, a man who, due to Infostamp exposure, believed himself to be an incarnation of the Doctor. (TV: The Next Doctor [+]Loading...["The Next Doctor (TV story)"])
  • The Tenth Doctor introduced himself as John Smith to Cleo. (COMIC: The Fountains of Forever [+]Loading...["The Fountains of Forever (comic story)"])
  • He used the alias "Dr. John Smith" when he claimed to be replacing Dr. Bell from the Inspectorate. (COMIC: The Lost Dimension [+]Loading...["The Lost Dimension (comic story)"])
  • The Tenth Doctor used the alias while pretending to be a manager of the Brainy Crisps industry. (PROSE: Code of the Krillitanes [+]Loading...["Code of the Krillitanes (novel)"])

Other aliases[[edit]]

Nicknames[[edit]]

  • Fireplace Man (TV: The Girl in the Fireplace [+]Loading...["The Girl in the Fireplace (TV story)"])
  • Martian Boy: Donna Noble once called the Doctor by this name, earning his protests that he was not from Mars. (TV: The Runaway Bride [+]Loading...["The Runaway Bride (TV story)"])
  • Easter Egg Man: (PROSE: The Secret Lives of Monsters [+]Loading...["The Secret Lives of Monsters (novel)"]) The Doctor's message to Sally Sparrow about the Weeping Angels (TV: Blink [+]Loading...["Blink (TV story)"]) was a mystery to the many others who watched the "easter egg" on the seventeen DVDs. As he was unidentified in the clip, those who watched it took to calling him the "Easter Egg Man." (PROSE: The Secret Lives of Monsters [+]Loading...["The Secret Lives of Monsters (novel)"])
  • Gramps: The Saxon Master once called the Doctor this name as a joke towards his old age. (TV: Last of the Time Lords [+]Loading...["Last of the Time Lords (TV story)"])
  • Gandalf: The Saxon Master once called the Doctor this name as a joke. (TV: Last of the Time Lords [+]Loading...["Last of the Time Lords (TV story)"])
  • Spaceman: Donna Noble often called the Doctor by this name and Christina de Souza also referred to the Tenth Doctor by this as well. (TV: The Fires of Pompeii [+]Loading...["The Fires of Pompeii (TV story)"], Planet of the Dead [+]Loading...["Planet of the Dead (TV story)"])
  • Mr Conditional Clause: A nickname given by a frustrated Luke Rattigan after the Doctor said "ATMOS system" as a clapback because "ATMOS" meant "Atmospheric Omission System" and the Doctor would, according to Luke, be saying "Atmospheric Omission System system". This was because Luke earlier had said to the thought of moving to other planets "if only that was possible" and the Doctor corrected him saying "if only that were possible", saying it was a "conditional clause". (TV: The Sontaran Stratagem [+]Loading...["The Sontaran Stratagem (TV story)"])
  • Pretty Boy: Used by River Song the first time he meets her from his point of view. (TV: Silence in the Library [+]Loading...["Silence in the Library (TV story)"], Forest of the Dead [+]Loading...["Forest of the Dead (TV story)"])
  • Baby Doctor: The Twelfth Doctor referred to this incarnation as such when fearing he would be "Scary Doctor". (COMIC: Four Doctors [+]Loading...["Four Doctors (comic story)"])
  • Doc-Dude: Referred to as such by Cindy Wu after the Doctor forbade her from calling him "Baby", "Buster" and "Dude". (COMIC: Lady of the Blue Box [+]Loading...["Lady of the Blue Box (comic story)"])
  • Bambi: The Twelfth Doctor called the Tenth this due to his large brown eyes. (COMIC: Vortex Butterflies [+]Loading...["Vortex Butterflies (comic story)"])
  • Merlin: The Tenth Doctor claimed that he was called Merlin by King Arthur. (COMIC: Fugitive [+]Loading...["Fugitive (comic story)"])
  • Matchstick Man: A nickname given to him by his successor upon noticing that he had been exceptionally thin. (TV: The Day of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Day of the Doctor (TV story)"])
  • Daddy's Suit: The War Doctor's nickname for the Tenth Doctor, due to his dress sense. (PROSE: The Day of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Day of the Doctor (novelisation)"])
  • Sandshoes: A mocking nickname given to him by the Eleventh Doctor in reference to his choice of footwear. (TV: The Day of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Day of the Doctor (TV story)"])
  • Dick van Dyke: Another mocking nickname given by the Eleventh Doctor, after the Tenth commented on the War Doctor's gravelly voice. (TV: The Day of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Day of the Doctor (TV story)"])

Titles and epitaphs[[edit]]

Eleventh Doctor[[edit]]

Known uses of John Smith[[edit]]

Other aliases[[edit]]

Impersonations[[edit]]

Nicknames[[edit]]

  • Mr. Moon: A descriptive name the Doctor gave himself after first examining his new face. (PROSE: The Day of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Day of the Doctor (novelisation)"])
  • Sweetie: Frequently used by River Song as a dual greeting and affectionate nickname. (TV: The Time of Angels [+]Loading...["The Time of Angels (TV story)"], et al.)
  • Space Gandalf: When questioned by Amy as to what kind of person he's like, the Doctor answered that he was like a "Space Gandalf". (TV: Meanwhile in the TARDIS 2 [+]Loading...["Meanwhile in the TARDIS 2 (TV story)"])
  • Mr Cool (TV: Amy's Choice [+]Loading...["Amy's Choice (TV story)"])
  • Ancient Amateur: The Doctor described himself as such to Craig Owen. (TV: The Lodger [+]Loading...["The Lodger (TV story)"])
  • Caesar: A Roman Auton, under the influence of River Song's hallucinogenic lipstick, in 102 A.D., mistook the Doctor for Caesar. (TV: The Pandorica Opens [+]Loading...["The Pandorica Opens (TV story)"])
  • My Love: A term of affection River Song used for the Doctor. (TV: The Pandorica Opens [+]Loading...["The Pandorica Opens (TV story)"])
  • Bowtie me: The Tenth Doctor referred to this incarnation to his companions. (COMIC: Four Doctors [+]Loading...["Four Doctors (comic story)"])
  • Posh Doctor: The Twelfth Doctor referred to this incarnation as such when fearing he would be "Scary Doctor". (COMIC: Four Doctors [+]Loading...["Four Doctors (comic story)"])
  • Legs Eleven: Called this by the Twelfth Doctor when referring to this incarnation to Gabby Gonzalez. (COMIC: Four Doctors [+]Loading...["Four Doctors (comic story)"])
  • Laughing Boy: Referred to as this by the Ninth Doctor, after the Eleventh Doctor was found trapped in a Type One TARDIS. (COMIC: The Lost Dimension [+]Loading...["The Lost Dimension (comic story)"])
  • Time Boy: Used by Mels, the second incarnation of River Song, as she anticipated meeting the Doctor while growing up with her parents in Leadworth. (TV: Let's Kill Hitler [+]Loading...["Let's Kill Hitler (TV story)"])
  • Also Not Mum: Called this by Alfie Owens in 2011. (TV: Closing Time [+]Loading...["Closing Time (TV story)"])
  • The Chin: Oswin Oswald called the Eleventh Doctor this when encountering him on the Dalek asylum due to his prominent chin. (TV: Asylum of the Daleks [+]Loading...["Asylum of the Daleks (TV story)"])
  • Monster: Ada Gillyflower called the Doctor her "monster", after he had been rejected by Mr Sweet's poison. She kept him alive because it was strange that he survived despite "rejection", and to have her own secret. (TV: The Crimson Horror [+]Loading...["The Crimson Horror (TV story)"])
  • Bow Tie: The War Doctor's nickname for the Eleventh Doctor, due to his dress sense. (PROSE: The Day of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Day of the Doctor (novelisation)"])
  • Chinny: The Tenth Doctor's nickname for the Eleventh Doctor, due to his prominent chin. (TV: The Day of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Day of the Doctor (TV story)"])
  • Doctor Boss (COMIC: Pay the Piper [+]Loading...["Pay the Piper (comic story)"])

Titles and epitaphs[[edit]]

  • Raggedy Man: A name given to the Eleventh Doctor by Amelia Pond, due to wearing the tattered remains of his predecessor's outfit. She told other people in Leadworth about the "Raggedy Doctor" and they referred to him in this way when they met him. (TV: The Eleventh Hour [+]Loading...["The Eleventh Hour (TV story)"]) Amy called him that just before she was permanently sent to the past by a Weeping Angel. (TV: The Angels Take Manhattan [+]Loading...["The Angels Take Manhattan (TV story)"]) As he was about to regenerate, the Doctor hallucinated Amy telling him affectionately "Raggedy Man, good night". (TV: The Time of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Time of the Doctor (TV story)"])
  • A Madman with a Box: A title Amy Pond bestows on him on their first encounter after fourteen years, which he later adopted. (TV: The Eleventh Hour [+]Loading...["The Eleventh Hour (TV story)"])
  • The Rotmeister: When he is talking to Craig Owens about the suspiciously growing rot on his ceiling, he refers to himself as the "Rotmeister" since he was an expert in rot. (TV: The Lodger [+]Loading...["The Lodger (TV story)"])
  • The Ghost of Christmas Past (TV: A Christmas Carol [+]Loading...["A Christmas Carol (TV story)"])
  • Chief Executive: Alias used by the Doctor under the influence of the Entity. (COMIC: The Rise and Fall [+]Loading...["The Rise and Fall (comic story)"], The Other Doctor [+]Loading...["The Other Doctor (comic story)"])
  • The King of Okay: A title he gave to himself when Amy was shocked to see him alive and well, having seen his older self be shot and killed at Lake Silencio. He immediately tossed the idea aside, saying it was a "rubbish title", giving Rory his own title instead. (TV: The Impossible Astronaut [+]Loading...["The Impossible Astronaut (TV story)"])
  • My Thief / My Beautiful Idiot: Names given to the Doctor by the spirit of his TARDIS during their brief time together when House took over the empty shell. (TV: The Doctor's Wife [+]Loading...["The Doctor's Wife (TV story)"])
  • The Anti-Squid: A title the Doctor put little thought into due to the lack of preparation time. Meaning of the title is that he is the Devil of the space squid religion. (PROSE: Space Squid [+]Loading...["Space Squid (comic story)"])
  • The Mad Monk: Called this by the public in 1207 Cumbria, although it was noted that he was "definitely not a Monk". (TV: The Bells of Saint John [+]Loading...["The Bells of Saint John (TV story)"])
  • Clara's Boyfriend: Called this by Angie Maitland when she discovered Clara and the Doctor were time travellers (TV: The Crimson Horror [+]Loading...["The Crimson Horror (TV story)"]) and called so by Artie Maitland upon leaving the TARDIS. (TV: Nightmare in Silver [+]Loading...["Nightmare in Silver (TV story)"]) He would later pose as Clara's Swedish boyfriend to her family. (TV: The Time of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Time of the Doctor (TV story)"]) Shortly after regenerating, the Twelfth Doctor clarified that he was not Clara's boyfriend, though he added that "it wasn't [her] mistake". (TV: Deep Breath [+]Loading...["Deep Breath (TV story)"])
  • Number Eleven: Clara reminding him that he has not run out of regenerations. When the Doctor reminds her of "Captain Grumpy" (the War Doctor), she calls him "Number Twelve". (TV: The Time of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Time of the Doctor (TV story)"])
  • The Imp of the Pandorica: Among the names for the Doctor recorded by the Testimony, (TV: Twice Upon a Time [+]Loading...["Twice Upon a Time (TV story)"]) in reference to the prison in which the Eleventh Doctor was sealed. (TV: Twice Upon a Time [+]Loading...["Twice Upon a Time (TV story)"])
  • The Beast of Trenzalore: Among the names for the Doctor recorded by the Testimony, (TV: Twice Upon a Time [+]Loading...["Twice Upon a Time (TV story)"]) in reference to the Siege of Trenzalore in which the Eleventh Doctor defended the town of Christmas. (TV: The Time of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Time of the Doctor (TV story)"]) Also, a name used in reference to the Doctor by the Great Intelligence, though only as "the Beast". (TV: The Name of the Doctor [+]Loading...["The Name of the Doctor (TV story)"])
  • The Demon: Kovarian taught the assassins she raised to kill the Doctor to refer to him as the Demon. The sound of his TARDIS was also referred to as "the Demon's roar". (AUDIO: The Furies [+]Loading...["The Furies (audio story)"])

Twelfth Doctor[[edit]]

Known uses of John Smith[[edit]]

Other aliases[[edit]]

  • Prisoner 428: His assumed title during his time in the Prison. (PROSE: The Blood Cell [+]Loading...["The Blood Cell (novel)"])
  • The Architect: A title used to disguise his identity when arranging to rob the Bank of Karabraxos; until the heist was almost complete, he was unable to remember this thanks to the deliberate use of a memory worm. (TV: Time Heist [+]Loading...["Time Heist (TV story)"])
  • Dr McGuiness: An alias he assumed while investigating "the Bell" experiment in 1944, but was quickly found out and mistaken for a German spy. (PROSE: The Crawling Terror [+]Loading...["The Crawling Terror (novel)"])
  • Skovox Artificer: Using a voice manipulator, the Doctor was able to convince a Skovox Blitzer that he was its superior and got it to deactivate itself. (TV: The Caretaker [+]Loading...["The Caretaker (TV story)"])
  • Doc Tardis: An alias given to him by Bernice Summerfield. (PROSE: Big Bang Generation [+]Loading...["Big Bang Generation (novel)"])
  • Doctor John Disco: At some point, the Doctor began referring to himself as Doctor Disco on answering machines. (TV: The Zygon Invasion [+]Loading...["The Zygon Invasion (TV story)"]) He later started introducing himself as Dr. John Disco. (TV: The Zygon Inversion [+]Loading...["The Zygon Inversion (TV story)"], Thin Ice [+]Loading...["Thin Ice (TV story)"])
  • Funkenstein: The Doctor introduced himself as "Doctor Funkenstein" to Walsh, (TV: The Zygon Invasion [+]Loading...["The Zygon Invasion (TV story)"]) and later as "Inspector Funkenstein [of] Rodent Squad" to Lloyd Collins. (COMIC: The Pestilent Heart [+]Loading...["The Pestilent Heart (comic story)"])
  • Basil: The Doctor jokingly said this was his real name when questioning Petronella Osgood about what her given name was, and she began referring to him as such. (TV: The Zygon Inversion [+]Loading...["The Zygon Inversion (TV story)"])
  • Patient 89: The Doctor's number while waiting at New Hippocrates. (COMIC: The Day at the Doctors [+]Loading...["The Day at the Doctors (comic story)"])
  • Inspector Morse (COMIC: The Pestilent Heart [+]Loading...["The Pestilent Heart (comic story)"])
  • Special Agent Dan Dangerous from Scotland Yard: The Doctor made up this name when he first introduced himself to Lucy Fletcher. (TV: The Return of Doctor Mysterio [+]Loading...["The Return of Doctor Mysterio (TV story)"])
  • Circe: Used by the Doctor while trying to infiltrate Missy's women-only social media chatroom. (PROSE: Girl Power! [+]Loading...["Girl Power! (short story)"])
  • Doctor Robert Louis Stephenson of the Royal College of Physicians: Used while investigating the mysterious events surrounding the plague outbreak in Edinburgh in 1645. (PROSE: Plague City [+]Loading...["Plague City (novel)"])
  • Doctor Destructo: Used by the Doctor on visiting Sunstrike on a mission from the Time Agency with Keira Sanstrom, who was then forced to introduce herself as Keira Destructo, his niece. (AUDIO: Sunstrike [+]Loading...["Sunstrike (audio story)"])

Impersonations[[edit]]

Nicknames[[edit]]

  • Boney Rascal: A nickname given to him by Robin Hood, due to the Doctor's slim and aged appearance. (TV: Robot of Sherwood [+]Loading...["Robot of Sherwood (TV story)"])
  • The Caretaker: Called as such by both staff and students of Coal Hill School during his brief reign as the school's caretaker. (TV: The Caretaker [+]Loading...["The Caretaker (TV story)"])
  • Outer Space Dad: Called so by Danny after he learned about the Doctor's identity; at the time, he had mistaken the Doctor for Clara's father. (TV: The Caretaker [+]Loading...["The Caretaker (TV story)"])
  • Nosferatu: Called so by corrupt cops working for Scindia-Corp, due to his aged appearance and the possibility of him being a vampiric creature that killed Tiger. (COMIC: The Swords of Kali [+]Loading...["The Swords of Kali (comic story)"])
  • Spindly Stick-insect: Called so by Chandra Scindia. (COMIC: The Swords of Kali [+]Loading...["The Swords of Kali (comic story)"])
  • The Cat in the Hat: Referred to as such by Johnny Dragotta. (COMIC: Gangland [+]Loading...["Gangland (comic story)"])
  • Mr. Grumpy: Referred to as such by the Tenth Doctor. (COMIC: Four Doctors [+]Loading...["Four Doctors (comic story)"])
  • Herrdoctor (COMIC: The Instruments of War [+]Loading...["The Instruments of War (comic story)"])
  • Skeleton Man: A name given to him by Shona McCullough, who had mistaken him for a ghost when they first met. (TV: Last Christmas [+]Loading...["Last Christmas (TV story)"])
  • The Eyebrows: A nickname given to him by Missy to differentiate the twelfth incarnation from the other Doctors. (TV: The Witch's Familiar [+]Loading...["The Witch's Familiar (TV story)"])
  • Ducks (COMIC: Witch Hunt [+]Loading...["Witch Hunt (comic story)"])
  • Me with the eyebrows: The Tenth Doctor calls him this to address him directly. (COMIC: The Lost Dimension [+]Loading...["The Lost Dimension (comic story)"])
  • Granddad: Nickname given by the Tenth Doctor to reference his age. (COMIC: The Lost Dimension [+]Loading...["The Lost Dimension (comic story)"])

Titles and epitaphs[[edit]]

Thirteenth Doctor[[edit]]

Known uses of Jane Smith[[edit]]

Other aliases[[edit]]

Nicknames[[edit]]

Titles and epitaphs[[edit]]

  • The Timeless Child: First spoken to the Doctor by the Remnants, though not in direct reference to her, (TV: The Ghost Monument [+]Loading...["The Ghost Monument (TV story)"]) this title referenced the Doctor's potential many incarnations that existed before the incarnation which she believed to be her first incarnation. (TV: The Timeless Children [+]Loading...["The Timeless Children (TV story)"])

Fourteenth Doctor[[edit]]

Nicknames[[edit]]

Titles and epitaphs[[edit]]

  • Grand Master of the Knowledge (TV: The Star Beast [+]Loading...["The Star Beast (TV story)"])

Fifteenth Doctor[[edit]]

Nicknames[[edit]]

  • The Dancing Man: upon seeing the Doctor a day after their encounter in a nightclub, Ruby Sunday identified him as such in her mind. (PROSE: The Church on Ruby Road [+]Loading...{"page":"61","chaptnum":"Nine","1":"The Church on Ruby Road (novelisation)"})

Miscellaneous[[edit]]

Other aliases[[edit]]

Nicknames[[edit]]

  • Damsel: A codename for the Doctor that River Song used on her missions, owing to the fact that he "needed rescuing a lot" of the time. (TV: The Husbands of River Song [+]Loading...["The Husbands of River Song (TV story)"])

Titles and epitaphs[[edit]]

Other[[edit]]

Behind the scenes[[edit]]

The Doctor's name[[edit]]

This section needs a cleanup.

Outdated, the name is used in The Trial of Doctor Who (short story) which clarifies its usage.

Invalid sources[[edit]]

  • After giving up his name, the War Doctor tested several aliases, including "Mister Moody", which he dropped when it proved incapable of eliciting shock and awe on the battlefield. (PROSE: The Doctor of War)

Ordinal or cardinal[[edit]]

In The ArcHive Tapes, the narrator refers to the different incarnations of the Doctor as "Doctor (cardinal number)" rather than "the (ordinal number) Doctor".

Footnotes[[edit]]

  1. The actual signature is not seen on screen, but Sylvester McCoy's hand movement in the scene makes it clear that he signed a question mark.
  2. Doctor Who's real name is Mildred, claims Steven Moffat. NME. Retrieved on 12 April 2016.